Archive for the ‘public art’ Category

There are two public art exhibits now on display at Harbourfront’s Ontario Square.  The first is “Built on Genocide” by by Jay Soule aka CHIPPEWAR which is part of this year’s Luminato Festival ….  “In the mid-19th century, an estimated 30 to 60 million buffalo roamed the prairies, by the late 1880s, fewer than 300 remained. As the buffalo were slaughtered and the prairie ecosystem decimated, Indigenous peoples were robbed of their foods, lands, and cultures. The buffalo genocide became a genocide of the people” (quote source: Luminato website)

below: The centerpiece is a pile of Buffalo skulls.

a large pile of buffalo skulls, art installation, with glass and steel condos rising behind,

below: Surrounding the skulls are posters that highlight and criticize government policies towards First Nations including (Prime Minister) Sir John A. Macdonald and his “Magic Eraser”, i.e. the Indian Act of 1876.

people looking at large posters, part of art installation, built on genocide

below: The poster on the left references the adoption of First Nations children by non-Native families often referred to as the Sixties Scoop because it reached its peak (most adoptions) in the 1960s.  The plight of Indigenous women is the subject of the other poster – the disproportionate number of whom have been murdered or went missing.

2 posters, adoption of mass destruction, and I am a mother sister auntie grandmother, protest signs on indigenous rights and past Canadian history of abuses

a man on a bike and a woman with a large backpack standing in front of posters by Jay Soule on display outside at Harbourfront, Indigenous Rights, history of abuse, protest,

There is also a display of large photographs by Meryl McMaster.

below: What Will I Say to the Sky and the Earth II.

large photograph by Meryl McMaster on display at Canada Square at Harbourfont - woman standing in the snow

below: On the Edge of This Immensity

woman holding a small boat on her shoulders, lake in the background, large photograph by Meryl McMaster on display at Canada Square at Harbourfont

below: As Immense as the Sky

woman with back to camera on a rock ledge overlooking a green landscape large photograph by Meryl McMaster on display at Canada Square at Harbourfont

on King Street West

a line of 7 large photographs as part of a display by Metro Hall on King Street

On display by Metro Hall on King Street West are a dozen large images created by Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs.  This installation is part of the Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival.

a woman stops to take a picture of a large photo on display on King Street West while a man and his black dog keep walking past the photos

The pair took photographs in the Maldives.  The fragile environment of these small islands (in the Indian Ocean) is exacerbated by the fact that they are barely above sea level.   There are more than 1000 islands that make up the Maldives and 80% are no higher than a meter above sea level.  Most are uninhabited.

people in front of a display of large photos

Onorato and Krebs have manipulated some of the prints with various methods and in doing to “they create quasi-abstract images that inventively describe their perceptions of place. Fusing reality and imagination, their suite of images are powerful fictions that confront undeniable facts. ” (quote source: Scotiabank Contact website).

three large photographs, part of Future Perfect, an installation by Nico Krebs and Taiyo Onorato,

a woman in a mask walks past photo exhibit Future Perfect by Nico Krebs and Taiyo Onorato

from King Street West

2 black and white stickers on a red newspaper box

below: Palace Arms hotel on King Street West at Strachan

pinkish Palace Arms Hotel boarding house at King and Bathurst, with new TTC streetcar beside it

below: Southeast corner of Strachan and Wellington

southeast corner of Bathurst and Wellington, pale pink three storey building on the corner, newer glass and steel condos behind

below: She’s looking in the window

little blond doll with orange dress on top of a small stone birdbath shape outside a building, she looks to be looking in the window

below: Harry Rogers worked for the city of Toronto in various capacities between 1921 and 1971.   He was Commissioner of City Properties in the 1960s.  Has this sign been here since then?

old bent no parking sign on side of building, .H.H. Rogers, commissioner of parking

below: Part of Garrison Crossing pedestrian bridge

looking southeast over railway tracks, Garrison Crossing pedestrian bridge, and downtown highrises in the background

behind metal fencing on Garrison Crossing bridge, tents for homeless

CN Tower and downtown Toronto buildings from Garrison Crossing bridge (looking east)

GO train on tracks, repair and maintenance trucks parked beside the tracks, CN Tower and downtown Toronto in the background

below: Yellow wild flowers growing in the field between the two sections of Garrison Crossing bridge. Looking east to downtown Toronto.

field of yellow wildflowers at garrison common, with view of CN Tower and Toronto skyline in the background

below: There are more than wild flowers between the bridges!

glass and steel condo development at garrison common

below: Sun bathing at Garrison Common, just outside Fort York

Garrison Common by Fort York, woman sun bather in bikini, art exhibit on fence surrounding the fort

below: On the fence between Fort York and the Bentway there is a series of images that I happened upon the day I walked this route. This is GradEX 106, the work of graduating students in OCADU’s Graphic Design and Illustration program.  My apologies to the few students whose work I inadvertently missed.

below: Michael Hu, Shahrzad Soroosh, Lydia Lam, and Dan Waites

part of exhibit of OCADU graduating students work from Illustration program, 4 students, Michael Hu, Shahrzad Soroosh, Lydia Lam, and Dan Waites,

below: Aidan Wilkins, Merryn Connelly-Miller, Vincy Lam, and Rebecca Michie

OCADU Gradex work by students graduating in Illustration, work of 4 students on display, Aidan Wilkins, Merryn Connelly-Miller, Vincy Lim, and Rebecca Michie

below: Leann Mei Foon, Tina Shan, Ivan Nikitin, and Emmily Fay Fin

OCADU graduating student work by 4 students,Leann Mei Foon, Tina Shan, Ivan Nikitin, and Emmily Fay Fin

below: Valerie Poon, Radha Joshi Raulgaonkar, Alan Zhang, and Sid Sharp

graduating students art exhibit, OCADU, graphic design and illustration, work by 4 students, Valerie Poon, Radha Joshi Raulgaonkar, Alan Zhang, and Sid Sharp

below: Joy Kim, Victoria Tao, Mia Debbas, and Emily Dakin

OCADU graduating student work by 4 students, Joy Kim, Victoria Tao, Mia Debbas, and Emily Dakin,

below: Lucy Hong, Thamara Perera, Tianshu Kuai, Jenny Lynne Castillo, Reyhaneh Mohammadi, and Caroline Icardo

a section of fence around Fort York with artwork on it, exhibit of OCADU gradex for graduating illustration students, work by six students, Lucy Hong, Thamara Perera, Tianshu Kuai, Jenny Lynne Castillo, Reyhaneh Mohammadi, and Caroline Icardo

below: Fence on west side of Fort York

a section of fence around Fort York with artwork on it, exhibit of OCADU gradex for graduating illustration students

below: More of the OCADU exhibit on the fence between Fort York and the Bentway

OCADU art display on fence between Fort York and the Bentway

below: Caitlin Todd, Alizah Hashemy, Lina Wu, and Lisanne Van Der Oort,

graduating students art exhibit, OCADU, graphic design and illustration, work by 4 students, Caitlin Todd, Alizah Hashemy, Lina Wu, and Lisanne Van Der Oort

below: Jon Owen, Joanne Lee, Kyle Miron, Vuoni, Selina Serok Park, Sarah McIntosh,

last six panels in graduating students art exhibit, OCADU, graphic design and illustration, work by Jon Owen, Joanne Lee, Kyle Miron, Vuoni, Selina Serok Park, Sarah McIntosh

below: Liam Marks, Daniel Mendez, Daniel Melnyk, Haojun Gong, Jingyi Dong, and Mika Parial

six panels in graduating students art exhibit, OCADU, graphic design and illustration, art by Liam Marks, Daniel Mendez, Daniel Melnyk, Haojun Gong, Jingyi Dong, and Mika Parial

Also at the Bentway is an art installation called ‘Playing in Public‘.  This is part of ArtworxTO, Toronto’s year of public art 2021-2022.   Three of the installations are shown below – they will remain at the Bentway until 26th September 2021.

below: ‘Nil:Nil’ by Studio F Minus

part of Playing in Public, an art installtion at the Bentway, two screens looking like smartphones play videos of kids kicking soccer ball. a real ball passes through a see through plastic tunnel between the screens

below: ‘Double Dribble’ by Esmaa Mohamoud

many different sizes of basketball hoops with chains mounted at different heights along the Bentway, part of art installation Playing in Public

below: ‘Big Red’ by Assemble

part of Playing in Public, an art installtion at the Bentway, small red slides with steps, in front of the old rusted metal walls near the entrance to Fort York

Yonge and Dundas and thereabouts

below: Part of a large relief sculpture on the wall of the northwest entrance to Dundas subway station of life sized figures on their way –  Terra cotta artwork by William McElcheran from 2015.

part of relief sculpture at Dundas subway station, a man holds on to his hat as he hurries along

below: Ryerson Image Centre,

photographs of famous Canadians on the outer wall of Ryerson Image Center, with woman sitting on the concrete surrounding the reflecting pool by the entrance to R I C

There is a photography exhibit outside the Ryerson Image Centre showcasing three winners of the New Generation Photography Award, Chris Donovan, Dustin Bron, and Curtiss Randolph.

below: ‘Boy in the Window’ by Chris Donovan

a black and white photo by Chris Donovan with reflections of a boy in a window and street scene below, on display outside Ryerson Image Centre

below: A second, “Objects in Mirror” also by Chris Donovan

black and white photo of cars, Chris Donovan, on exhibit

below: ‘AC 2019’ by Dustin Brons

below: ‘Horizon 2017’ by Curtiss Randolph.  First in a short series involving a staged drama at this intersection.

a coloured photo of a corner of an intersection with a gas station on it, Horizons, houses, apartment building in background

below: The statue of Egerton Ryerson is gone.  There is graffiti on the walls where the statue once stood.

place where statue of Egerton Ryerson once stood, a single tree, graffiti on the walls of the building

below: On the Bond Street side of the Ryerson building is another photography exhibit.  This is Maximum Exposure 26, an annual exhibit of pictures by Ryerson’s School of Image Arts students.   There are 28 very diverse photos included here.

large collage pf photos on wall of Ryerson Image Centre, Maximum Exposure 26, work of graduating students

below: Food Pantry.  Take what you need; Donate what you can.

Free food pantry, shelves with glass covered doors for food to exchange, it is almost empty

below: In the alley behind the Lutheran church and Ryerson.

alley behind Ryerson Image Centre with large murals of green bike and blue bike, also with a person asleep in the alley by the church

below: Peace, hearts and respect written on the green bike.

below: The old white building on the northeast corner of Victoria and Dundas is still there and the mural by Emily May Rose with its cute raccoons survives.  If only the real raccoons were as lovable!

below: Looking east on Dundas.  There is talk of renaming Dundas Street.

below: Yonge Dundas Square is now filled with hearts.  There are pink heart shaped seats to sit on and pink hearts on the ground too.  Each heart on the pavement has something about Toronto to love – street art,  endless streets to explore, the Jays, great architecture, always changing, and more.

a man stands beside his Christian religious display at Yonge Dundas square while he talks to two men about Jesus

below: Keep looking up!

Yonge Street, looking up at banners on metal poles, tops of some highrise buildings,
below: Another part of a large relief sculpture on the wall of Dundas subway station

 

crocheted concentric circles in a window with reflections of the houses across the street

Oakwood Village BIA is centered on Oakwood Avenue, south of Eglinton West.

Toronto street signs, Jesmond Ave with Oakwood village top,

below: “Celebrating Queer Black Lives (2021) by Curtia Wright.  This is also part of a STEPS project, I HeART Main Street, which features 26 murals on “Main Streets” in Ontario this year.

mural on the side of The Beer Store, in bright colours, two women with dreadlocks, eyes closed and about to kiss

below: We are all Canadians, and with a big heart too

hand written sign in window that says We live in Canada We are all Canadians, Toronto Ontario, Below sign is a heart made of crocheted circles in different colours

below: Sidewalk games
paintings on sidewalk, game with numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, blue water a truck, and a hot air balloon

below: Sidewalk vowels
drawings and paintings on the sidewalk featuring vowels, A E I O and U

below: Shiny palm tree about 5 metres tall – an art installation from 2010 on the traffic island where Oakwood meets Vaughan Road.  It serves as homage to the neighbourhood’s Caribbean community.

Shiny metal sculpture of a palm tree

a house with a glassed in front porch and a Canadian flag flying outside the door, other stores and houses in the background

two small houses pus a couple of slightly larger houses on Oakwood, two have front porches with chairs on them, and well tended front lawns

a grey concrete flower pot that is supposed to look like Roman urn, with bright red flowers growing in it plus a blue and white polka dot child's plastic windmill

below: Rusty the Snowman!

an old rusted metal decoration on a chainlink gate.  laughing snowman, front steps and flowers in planters in the background

below: La Cubana, Supermercado Latina.

La Cubana supermercado Latino, grocery store, first storey painted in blue and white stripes like the Cuban flag,  Cuban flag hanging in the window

The side of La Cubana supermercado grocery store with pictures of food, also stored items under blue tarps, and a bell box painted with a yellow measuring tape and articles of clothing, a bonnet, a tie, a cap, and three pairs of shoes

A purple picture in the window of a door with a cardboard sign in middle that says Please do not put garbage in front of the store, reflections of stores across the street in the window as well

Awning cover on Edmundo Snack bar, with round Carlsberg beer advert above it, exterior

three storey white brick building with reddish mansard roof, lower floor is Asmareeno Grocery and Alert Pest Control

items for sale in displayed in store window that is still decorated for Christmas even though it is summer.  Bowls, tea pots, dishes

reflections in the window of Alfredos hair styling, closed, with a small Canadian flag in the window

below: Recently sold, Open Bible Baptist Church, just south of Eglinton.

old red brick church at 587 Oakwood, windows boarded up and cross removed from over front door

The New Jerusalem Spanish Church with a green hedge in front of it

below: Old gate in front of new (or being renovated) house

below: Where WTF = Wear The Facemask!

4 broken front door bell buzzers on a white peeling paint wall showing yellow paint below.  sticker on yellow with man from monopoly game saying covid? wtf*?  *wear the mask

below: Reggae Lane, just south of Eglinton. The mural in the background was painted by Adrian Hayles in 2015.  Better pictures of it are on a previous blog post about Reggae Lane

murals on reggae lane

graffiti, black spray paint on a light grey concrete wall, outline of a person holding up a sign above head that says Afroism, 2020

below: Waiting…..

below: Never Give Up!

door with a window at 506 Oakwood, with a picture of a bird with a frog in its beak and the words Never give up

a woman dresses in black t shirt and shorts and holding her bike is getting sir from an air pump at an ultramar service center

below: Looking north up Oakwood to Eglinton West. The construction of Oakwood station still has a long way to go! The previous blog post (‘Eglinton and Oakwood’) looked at this intersection/construction.

looking north on Oakwood to where it ends at Eglinton West, crane, construction of new oakwood subway station

below: Southeast corner of Adelaide & Peter

Southeast corner of Adelaide and Peter, all tall buildings

below: West side of Peter at Adelaide

West side of Peter at Adelaide.  New tall buildings except older beige building on the northwest corner.

below: Still standing – Second Empire style from the late 1850s, with a mansard roof that was added a little later. Just north of it, a 47 storey condo is being constructed.

old pale beige brick house from the late 1850s with brown mansard roof at the northwest  corner of Peter and Adelaide.  empty, boarded up, with some tags on it, metal exterior staircase from ground level to second story, Second Empire style

below: On the hoardings at this construction site on Peter, is “Toronto Makes Good” a photo exhibit hosted by JAYU and The STEPS Initiative that features the work of nine young people (ages 18 – 29).

hoardings at a construction site, large red and white sign on top that says made in Toronto, a parking meter machine on the sidewalk, two large photographs on the hoardings, part of an exhibit

below: “Swing Summer Away” by Johnny Wu. Taken at the CNE

Photograph on slightly reflective hoardings, black and white, CNE swings with people on the ride,

below: “Toronto Waterfront Silhouette” by April Beatson. Taken at one of the wave decks near Harbourfront.

hoardings on construction site, black and white photo of a skateboarder in the air above the wave deck on Toronto waterfront, reflections of the cars and buildings around in the black parts of the photo

below: “Members of a Nicaraguan Dance Troupe” by Tenzin Dorjé.  Taken at a performance at Mel Lastman Square.

photograph on hoardings, three women of Nicaraguan dance troupe in long colourful dresses, green, yellow, and orange, also with flowers in their hair

photograph on hoardings, three women of Nicaraguan dance troupe in long colourful dresses, red, yellow, and blue, also with flowers in their hair

below: “Game 6” by Stephen Attong. Raptors fans celebrating on the streets of Toronto after the team won their first NBA Championship.

black and white image of Raptors victory party on the streets of Toronto, on hoardings

parts of two photos that are exhibited adjacent to each other on construction hoardings. on left is people at street party after Raptors won the NBA series and on the right is a close up of a woman's face in profile

hoardings on Peter street, with covered walkway on sidewalk, photo exhibit on the hoardings

Other photographers with images on the hoardings: Holly Chang, Leilah Dhoré, Nawang Tsomo, Radha, and Sherry Yu.

below: Saving the old facade

yellow metal scaffolding to keep up the brick facade of an old building while the rest of it is demolished.

below: Some things can’t be saved.

old wood steps covered with a faded, well worn, carpet in greens and browns

windows of an empty building, one is broken.  Words pastries written on one window and word lunch written on broken window

chainlink fence and gate at construction site, remnants of interior wall still show old walls that were once pale yellow

2 round paper paste up slaps on a pole.  The upper one shows a map of the world with the Atlantic Ocean in the center, the lower one is the round part of an eye

Charlie Chaplin, large and in many colours

tall mural on a red brick building, left side of Charlie Chaplin's head, with hat on his head, mural in many colours and patterns

at Eglinton and…. Chaplin Cres of course

Eglinton Ave West, looking east at Chaplin Cres., looking towards Yonge Street,

Because of COVID, the annual ‘Winter Stations’ art installation at Woodbine beach was cancelled. Instead, there is ‘Spring Stations’ now showing at two locations including at the Distillery District.

below: “The Epitonium’ by Iranian design team of Mojtaba Anoosha, as well as M., Shahed, Elaheh, and Alemeh Yenglabad. It looks like a large sea snail has landed in the Distillery District.

art installation in Distillery District, large, white,

below: ‘ARc de Blob’ created by Austrian and UK team Aleksandra Belitskaja, Ben James and Shaun McCallum.

below: ‘From Small Beginnings’ by Jack and Charlie Leather behind the red heart.  The original design called for small spruce seedlings growing on the timbers.

Distillery district, a line of fake trees with trunks painted white, no leaves, beside a shiny red sculpture of a large heart.  Behind that is art installation called From Small Beginnings by Jack and Charlie Leather and it is a stack of timber arranged in a large upside down pyramid

Previous Winter Stations posts:
2019
2020

street art mural on the side of a building beside a car wash.  Car wash has bright turquoise wall with lots of garbage bins lined up along side it.

below: “88 Keys of Light”, a collaboration between Edward Platero and Kristyn Watterworth
upright painted piano sits on the sidewalk, five guitars on top if it

below: Southeast corner, Queen St East and Woodbine Ave

southeast corner of Woodbine and Queen St East, three storey brick building with stores on ground level, people waiting at traffic light,

from across the street, mural of a woman on a sofa reading a book, mural, covers window of an empty store, a woman in a red coat is walking past, the store to the right is for lease, the store to the left is a variety store with a blue and yellow sign,

small white house with blue trim and a yellow awning over the front door, white fence around the front yard, empty lot beside it with white tarp covering chainlink fence around the yard

below: A cheerful dalmatian stands outside Firehall 227

fire hydrant in front of a fire station 227 painted like a dalmation dog, white with black spots, a red hat with number 227 on its head, and a big smile on its face

below: Mural, “Greetings from the Beach” by Elise Goodhoofd

mural, Greetings from the Beaches by Elise Goodhoofd

a person sits on a bench in front of the Sunrise Grill on Queen East

below: A Lovebot sticker

pink lovebot sticker, with a blue heart, on the back of a stop sign, historic woodbine beach street sign for Queen Street East as well

below: Don’t tell her that her head is empty.

in a store window, florist, planter in the shape of a woman's head, also metal round trays of succulents

below: Another Starbucks gone.

empty storefront, with ghost Starbucks coffee sign across the front

below: faded to yellow

in a store window, fake licence plates with Canadian flags that have faded to yellow and white

below: Another Luminosity installation, “Headlights”, by Collective Memory aka Robert McKaye and Stoyan Barakov

Luminosity public art installation of 6 mannequins with lampshades for heads

below: About an hour later….

Luminosity art installation of mannequins with lampshades for heads.  night time, so dark outside, lights turned on inside shades

below: Mural by John Kuna painted in 2019. It replaced an earlier mural (2007, by Rudolf Stussi) that had deteriorated.

mural on Queen Street East, side of Foodland grocery store, scenes from the beach - a couple dancing by an outdoor pavillion, an Asian family having a picnic in the park, young adults playing beach volleyball, Leuty lighthouse, fireworks in the distance, by John Kuna and Mural Routes

below: Part of a mural, Scarborough Amusement Park, by Daniel Seagrave, 2008

Mural on a wall beside Subway fast food restaurant, a tree in front of the mural, old fashioned beach activities with people in period bathing costumes, red row boat, boardwalk, boat with orange sails
a lime green vw microbus parked in a driveway

below: Above the entrance to an empty store.
old sign above a store doorway, the word Mara with a woman in a blue dress lying across the last 3 letters, holding a big orange and red flower

below: One of many hearts shining in the windows.

blue LED lights in the shape of a heart in the window of a shoe store on Queen Street East

below: Looking in other windows too.

store window with a yellow LED light heart, a white head and shoulders mannequin with closed eyes and wearing a black covid mask with white maple leafs on it.

store window, wonder woman items, a large purple platform shoe,

looking in the window of a toy store

clothing store window with women's tops and blouses in orange hanging from a bar, a green and orange scarf around the neck of the orange knit top in front

looking in the window of a laundromat with no people in it, but with open sign

window of an art gallery at number 888, an abstract painting in the window predominantly red

looking diagonally across the street at a corner store, Convenience Plus as it gets dark outside

below: “Share the Love”, Thelia Sanders Shelton

Luminosity installation person holding a large red heart, in front of a TTC streetcar

Luminosity installation person holding a large red heart, with R C Harris filtration plant in the background

below: Part of “Beacon Silo” by Chris Foster
strips of mirrors forming a cylinder that rotates as coloured lights shine on it.

below: Same installation but from across the street
Under an umbrella shape - a series of mirrors making a cylinder that rotates, lights shining on it from the sides so the shapes of lights being reflected changes as the cylinder moves

a couple walk down the sidewalk, late evening as it gets dark

a string of yellow LED lights looped over branches of a large tree beside a row of stores, evening

below: “Out from under the Shadows”, by Bryan Faubert.  Light passes through cutouts in the metal plate to make shadow pictures on the wall.

below: Firehall 227 with it’s clock tower

Evening lights, exterior of Firehall number 227 at Queen East and Woodbine, clock tower shows 8:20,

below: Open doors, Firehall 227

night, exterior of firehall 227, open door showing interior and pepsi vending machine, bench on sidewalk,

back of a small house at night, gate open, light on in back room, tree by sidewalk,

old factory buildings in Liberty Village, with a connecting bridge between them that is over the street

Arty things around Liberty Village


small alley with a building on the right side with panels at street level that are decorated with murals

closer up view of murals in an alley

Back in May 2020, 14 benches in public places throughout Liberty Village were designed/decorated by different artists.

below: ‘Gathering’ by Patrick Li

a black metal bench with cut outs in red, of L and V shapes on the back piece
below: “Home of Innovation” by Jieun June Kim

a bench in Liberty Village with the back piece decorated in houses in primary coloursbelow: Red pigeons in front of a new condo – by Los Angeles-based artist Nathan Mabry.  If you step back and look at it from the right angle, the large red parts look like a pigeon as well.

Red metal sculpture in front of a new condo development in Liberty Village, with red metal pigeons on top of the shapes

below: ‘Perpetual Motion’ by Francisco Gazitua

a large white metal sculpture in a park in Liberty village

below: “In Memory of Omi and Opa” by Thelia Shelton

A black metal bench between the sidewalk and street, the back of the bench has yellow figures all holding hands

below: “Love Conquers Our Differences” designed by Christiano De Araujo and produced by David Ogilvie Engineering

an apartment building across the street, a bench on the sidewalk in the foreground.  The bench is red with a picture on the back of a man and woman yelling at each other and a red heart in the middle

street in Liberty Village, one utility pole is painted in turquoise with red triangles and the word Love written in cursive

metal bicycle rack with a large paste up of urban ninja squadron t bonez wearing white briefs and nothing else, also no head

below: Brightly carpeted stairs behind one of the old brick buildings typical of Liberty Village

a bright pink and orange carpet on the stairs leading to the second storey behind an old brick building in Liberty Village

below: mural by Jarus

mural of a woman sitting drinking coffee except the top part of her head and face are missing

below: One smart mural.

large mural that is the word genius

billboards and graffiti

turquoise metal box with liberty village words on a street

below: Grominator watches the dancers

grominator graffiti on a metal box beside sidewalk, a cherry picker lift machine parked beside it, under an overhang that says loading dock.  Mural of black people dancing on the wall behind the lifter.

black and red metal bench in front of a two storey beige brick wall with a large number 60 painted in black on it

below: It’s not easy these days but “smile, enjoy now”.

black and white picture of a woman in a white hat and white fluffy scarf on hoardings with blotches of yellow and blue, also blue writing that says smile enjoy now

you can have it all written in red on reflective hoardings

below: “Can” by Michelle Cieloszczyk, 2017

large sculpture of a crushed metal can, grey, beside a pile of snow on a pedestrian walkway in Liberty Village

decorative birdhouse with red roof with a string of lights and a fake cardinal or two

two yellow metal bumpers at the end of the railway tracks, left over from a real railway line, ends in park by a fence along another, real, train tracks, graffiti on the walls beyond the tracks, houses beyond that

Time for coffee!

blog_closed_seated_outside

exterior of Coffee Shop Loiue with sign in window above door that says this is a coffee shop

exterior view of a window that had clear plastic on it.  plastic is ripping and peeling