Posts Tagged ‘sculptures’

four sections of four different brain sculptures

The second annual Brain Project is now on display across the city.  These are only a small sample of the brain sculptures that form the exhibit.  In total there are 100 brains in about 20 locations around the city.   There is a map on the Brain Project website if you are interested in visiting some of them.

 

below: One of the locations where you can see some of the brain sculptures is Nathan Phillips Square.

a line of sculptures on display, podius standing in the water of the fountain, arches, and 3D Toronto sign in the backgruond.

Descriptions of all the brains on display around the city, as well as notes on the artists responsible, can be found online.    You can vote online for your favorite brain.

below:  Circles of beads and sequins – circles representing wholeness and totality come together to form a complex mosaic like the brain itself.  “Unleash Your Mind” is by Kara Ross.

a brain sculpture on display in front of the 3D toronto sign, decorated with colourful circles of sequins

below: Sitting on top of a blue and teal brain is a blue jay in a nest – a sculpture by Ted Hamer that is called “Thinkubator”.  Here the brain is shown as an idea incubator where the bird symbolizes the idea.

close up of part oa brain sculpture, the brain is painted blue and teal and there is a blue jay sitting on a nest on top of the egg (the bird is part of the sculpture)

below:  “Vitale” by Molly Gambardella is dedicated to the artist’s grandmother who died of Alzheimers in 2016.   Vitale was her maiden name.

a sculpture of a brain decorated with hundreds of coloured pencils, some are point up and some are blunt end up, the colours of the pencils make shapes and lines on the brain

below: Three of the brains on display at the Distillery District.  In front is “Red Head” by Anitra Hamilton who glued pieces of chicken eggshells to the surface of the brain.  Red acrylic paint highlights the spaces between the eggshells.   In the middle is Cindy Scaife’s “Food for Thought”.  Broccoli, avocado, apple and walnut, all healthy foods,  play in the park.

brain sculptures as part of the Baycret Foundation's Brain Project on display outside at the Distillery District

below: Also at the Distillery District is a brain by Laura Bundesen, “Not Forgotten” is a collage of fabric embellished with lace and embroidery and beads.  It is in memory of her stepmother who suffered from dementia.

close up of a fabric collage on a sculpture, bits of fabric with flowers on it, some embroidered leaves and flowers, lace and trim too,

Part of the goal of the project is raise awareness of diseases like Alzheimers that affect the brain.  Another goal was to raise money  – the sculptures are sponsored by various people and corporations (such as Telus).  As well, most of the brains from last year’s exhibit have been sold.  Funds raised through this project are donated to Baycrest Health Services.

below:  Keight MacLean’s “Loss” illustrates the idea of memory and memory loss using a portrait of a person, a loved one.  Paint as the memory loss, obscures the picture.

outdoor display in a clear acrylic box, a sculpture in the shape of a brain, with the picture of a woman's face on the side, yellow paint drips down from the top of the brain.

people looking at brain sculptures.  one is pointing to them, the other is taking a picture of them.

Sculptures by Ken Lum.

I was walking up Bay Street yesterday when I stopped.  Out of the corner of my eye I had caught a glimpse of a sculpture that I had never seen before.  It is ‘Two Children of Toronto’ by Ken Lum, 2013.

Two children, a boy and a girl, sit opposite each other, some distance between them.

two children of toronto, a sculpture by Ken Lum, two children seated on pedestals, about 25 feet apart, along the side of a walkay, with a concrete building beside them. The children are looking towards each other

What you can’t see in the above picture is that there are words in bronze mounted on the wall.  The words say: “Across time and space, two children of Toronto meet”.  The two kids are looking towards each but not each other.

sculpture, Two Children of Toronto by Ken Lum in a downtownwalkway with a concrete bulding beside it, girl's face

below: Both children are wearing clothes from bygone days.

sculpture, Two Children of Toronto by Ken Lum in a downtownwalkway with a concrete bulding beside it, looking towards the girl, with Bay Street and Canadian Tire store behind

below: But the boy’s clothes are more Chinese looking.

sculpture, Two Children of Toronto by Ken Lum in a downtownwalkway with a concrete bulding beside it, a boy is seated on a concrete pedestal.

After my walk the other day, I started researching Ken Lum.  I discovered that he has another sculpture nearby, and fortuitously, it was one that I took some pictures of back in December.  It is “Peace Through Valour” located at the NW corner of City Hall property.  Winston Churchill is standing close by.

a sculpture called Peace Through valour by Ken Lum, outside on a snowy day. A square piece with a soldier standing guard at each corner. On top of the flat squsre is a model of a town in square blocks (no details on the buildings).

It commemorates the 93,000 Canadians who fought in the Italian campaign of WW2 and was dedicated in June 2016.   A Canadian soldier stands vigil at each corner of the memorial.  The top of the 7 foot x 7 foot square is a topographical map of Ortona, a town in Italy that was a scene of a battle at Christmas time in 1943.  Ortona is on the Adriatic coast and its streets were narrow which made it difficult for Allied forces to liberate the town from Nazi Germany.

two soldiers stand vigil at the corners of a memorial, sculptures,

Money for the sculpture was donated by the Italian-Canadian community.

two soldiers stand vigil at the corners of a memorial, sculptures,

A walk towards Davisville subway station on a grey day.

below: At the corner of Mt Pleasant and Davisville stands the sculpture ‘Wind Bird’ by Sorel Etrog.  Etrog (1933-1914) was a Canadian artist, writer and sculptor.

 

a bronze sculpture of a thin figure with short arms reaching up. stylized, almost abstract. no facial features on the head that seems to be looking upwards

I have passed this little figure many times and today I finally decided to take some pictures of it and make a walk of it.  I have always thought that she was a forlorn little creature.   With her arms outstretched, empty,  reaching for something that never appears.  She needs a hug or at least a  warm scarf to keep the chill away.

below: After leaving Wind Bird empty handed yet again, I walked west towards Yonge Street.  Off the street and amongst some trees I saw this sculpture.   It is one that I have never noticed before.  A collection of metal pieces is suspended from the top of a lopsided metal frame, more parallelogram than rectangle.

rust coloured metal sculpture in front an apartment building. The sculpture is a large metal frame that looks like a cube but made of parallelograms and from the top is suspended a bunch of metal pieces.

below: On closer inspection, the metal bits are actually flat human forms with their heads in the center and feet flung outwards as if spinning around a central axis.  I know enough physics to know that either centrifugal force or centripetal forces (or both) are at play here.  But I don’t know enough to know the right answer.

close up of a sculpture of flat metal people shapes, forming a circle with their heads, their feet sticking out like in a centrifuge.

below:  Next door are these two metal shapes.  There isn’t much to it, is there?  What it does have is it’s own little park area and walkway.  I didn’t have to get my shoes muddy if I wanted to get closer.

A sculpture that is just two rectangular metal boxes upright, joined together and on a slight angle. In a small park in front of an apartment building at 141 Davisville in Toronto

below: There is a path that ran on the west side of the above building, 141 Davisville, to Balliol Street.   This tall sculpture stands beside the path.  I am not sure who the artist is.  Is it a couple embracing? Or a totem pole of abstract forms?  Or just something that looked good to the artist’s eye?

tall columnar sculpture somewhat resembling a totem pole, all in grey, beside some trees in front of an apartment building.

below:  Next, from across Balliol, this sculpture caught my eye.  It is ‘Grand Odalisque’ by Sorel Etrog.

Grand Odalisque, a sculpture by Sorel Etrog sits on a wood pedestal in front of the entrance to an apartment building.

below: I’m rarely satisfied with photos taken of public art in front of buildings.  The background is always to cluttered or messy.   I played with various angles for ‘Grand Odalisque’ and I found this one.  The sculpture is quite phallic now that I look at it.

Grand Odalisque, a sculpture by Sorel Ertog sits on a wood pedestal . Looking across Balliol from behind the sculpture. The scene across the street is a few men standing in front of a construction site where a new condo is being built

The phallic nature of the sculpture is possibly ironic .  Odalisque has a few meanings and connotations, but all involve women.  In fact, ‘La Grande Odalisque’ is a famous painting by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres in 1814.  In French, ‘grande’ is the feminine form of the adjective and ‘grand’ is the masculine.  Ingres used ‘grande’ for his female nude and Etrog used ‘grand’ for his sculpture.  Is there a connection?  Or just my imagination?

below: La Grande Odalisque.  You’ll have to visit the Louvre in Paris if you want to see the painting.

picture of the painting 'La Grande Odalisque' by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, 1814

The next stop along Davisville was the Al Green Sculpture Garden.  Al Green was a builder,  a founder of Greenrock Property Management, and in later life a sculptor.   It makes sense then that the small garden that bears his name, and is home to some of his sculptures, is between two of Greenrock’s apartment buildings.

below: ‘Leaning Torso’ by Al Green.

Al Green sculpture

below: ‘Embrace’ by Al Green

Al Green sculpture, The Embrace

below: ‘Landing Sculpture’ by Carl Lander (aka Carl Bucher), 1970.  They look like little red spaceships hovering in the air, or as the name suggests, coming in for landing.  Father and son alien ships come for a visit.
Lander (1935-2015) was a Swiss artist who lived in Canada for a couple of years in the early 1970s.

sculpture in front of an apartment building, two red shiny things that look like alien spaceships

below: Another sculpture by Sorel Etrog in the foreground.  Behind it is ‘Greenwin’ by Maryon Kantaroff, commissioned in 1973 by Greenwin Developments.

two tall thin sculptures, one by Sorel Etrog in the foreground and a greenish bronze by Kantaroff in the background.

And last, and very definitely least….

below:  You tell me.  Christmas balls on top of a fence?

three silver Christmas ball ornaments are attached to the top of a chain link fence

below:  Once you’ve figured out the whys and the wherefores of the above, you’ll be happy to know that there is another mystery.  A bagel?  A donut?  Squirrel food? Bird food?  But also a  ring?
These are on the fence that runs between Yonge St and the subway line near Davisville station.

a moldy partially eaten bagel or donut sits on top of a fence pole on a chain link fence

Since 1999 CANstruction has been an  annual contest amongst the GTA design community.  Companies build structures with canned or packaged foods for the benefit of the Daily Bread Food Bank.  These structures are then displayed and judged  before the food is donated.

Photos from some of the entries for this year’s competition:

below: Hunger for Sport, by HDR
Toronto is about to play host to both the PanAm Games and the ParaPan Games.  These games are a celebration of individual triumph and collective national achievement.  Food fuels the body and the mind and is needed for individuals to strive for their goals.  But many go without.

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - a white curved wall with two symbols representing sports on it

below: Feed People not Trash, by Cannon Design
Canadians waste food, a lot of food.  Expired food and uneaten leftovers become organic landfill.  This sculpture is an oversized trash can overflowing with food; about 12,000 of these sized trash cans of edible food are thrown out in Canada each day.

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - an oversized trash can overflowing with cans of food. The trash can is made of gray coloured cans

below: Food for Thought, by rebanks pepper littlewood architects inc.
Hunger can have a profound effect on the brain and as a result, how we learn, behave, and make decisions.  Healthy and energetic minds need complete and balanced meals.  This sculpture represents the brain with each lobe being a different food group and in turn, each food group is different coloured can.  Fruits and vegetables are green, grains are yellow, dairy is blue, and meats and other protein sources are red.

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - close up of a representation of the brain with a string of little lights representing the brain at work

31% of food bank recipients are children.  By feeding hungry mouths with good food we ensure that minds are nourished and the brain can focus on learning, developing, and growing.

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - close up of a representation of the brain with a string of little lights representing the brain at work

below: Constructing Hope, by PCL Constructors Canada with Entuitive
Biomimicry uses nature’s patterns and strategies to find solutions to human challenges.  Here we have a calla lily, a resilient and beautiful flower modelled from nature.   In turn, society can learn from nature to work together using available resources to ensure the survival of all.

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - a calla lily in yellow and blue cans

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - close up of the yellow and blue calla lily

below: Can the Force Be With You, by GHD Inc.

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - a large picture of Darth Vader's head

below: On the Front Lines of Hunger, by Aercoustics Engineering Ltd.
“The war against hunger is truly mankind’s war of liberation.”
It’s a war with many fronts.  Food inequality impacts 13% of Canadian households especially people with disabilities, single people, and single parent households.
“United we can stop hunger in its tracks.”

in the trenches, a sculpture made of cans on display as part of a competition

below: Oppor[tuna]ty by Ryerson University Dept of Architectural Science
The tuna fish is one of the most common sources of protein and other nutrients such as Vitamin B12 but it is still inaccessible and unaffordable for those who struggle financially.  The completed head and tail of this structure represent those who live comfortably.  The middle section, the “bare bones” of white beans, represent the nutritional issues faced by those who live on cheaper low protein foods.

a large fish skeleton, a sculpture made of cans on display as part of a competition, representing oppor Tuna ty

below: Fortuna, by BA Consulting Group
Fortuna was the ancient Roman goddess of fortune and symbol of the random and unpredictable forces that control human life.  This fortune cookie is made of over 9000 cans of tuna.

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - a large fortune cookie made of 9000 cans of tuna

below: Shifting Perspectives, by Quadrangle Architects
Objects seen from different angles appear differently.  So to with situations and challenges such as hunger in midst.

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - close up of a representation of the brain with a string of little lights representing the brain at work
sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - from one angle this sculpture is a red wall with the word HUNGRY written on it in block white letters

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - a red folded wall with a white plate, white knife and white fork on it.

 CANstruction was:
→ presented by Design Administration Canada,
→ supported by Consulting Engineers of Ontario and The Design Exchange, and
→ hosted by Cadillac Fairview Corp.

Information and photos from previous years entries on CANstruction website.

Bloor Yorkville Icefest, Frozen in Time
Cumberland Ave., February 21 & 22

 Ice sculpture beside a sidewalk.  The top part has the words Bloor Yorkville icefest and the bottom part has the words Frozen in time, icefest 15.   The middle section looks like a large face made of Egyptian motifs.

The 10th annual Icefest featured the carving of blocks of ice into Ancient Egypt themed sculptures.

Four ice sculptures with Ancient Egyptian themes - King Tut, and a pyramid amongst them.   Also a wall of hieroglypics with two guards beside it.

Both Saturday and Sunday were snowy days but the weather didn’t deter the crowds, or their picture taking.  I’m sure that there are thousands of photographs of the sculptures!
Here are a few of mine.

A man in a white parka is standing beside a sculpture with his elbow resting on it.  A woman in white coat and hat is taking his picture.

A woman is facing a sculpture of a dinosaur.  Both of them have their mouths wide open.

A boy is standing beside a sculpture

A mother with two little kids is posing with an ice sculpture.

A little girl in a pink snow suit it peaking throw a whole in an ice sculpture

A father is taking a photograph of his son beside an ice sculpture

A group of four people are standing around an ice sculpture.  They all have puzzled looks on their faces as though they can't figure out what the sculpture is supposed to be.

An ice sculpture of a bear with it's front paws raised, looms over the interesection of Yonge and Bloor.

This bear loomed over the NE corner of Yonge and Bloor.

Most of the sculptures along Cumberland Ave (west of Bellair) are still there and will remain as long as the temperatures remain low and no one vandalizes them.