Posts Tagged ‘contest’

This is the fourth year of the Brain Project.  Forty five sculptures in the shape of a brain have been decorated by different artists. They are on display at Nathan Phillips Square for the month of July.

brain shaped sculptures on display, with the 3 D Toronto sign and Toronto city hall in the background

below:  “Silver Bloom” by Carson Teal.  Complex, random, and fragmented.

a brain shaped 2 dimensional sculpture by Carson Teal, with white chicken eggs, broken mirrors, three fingers, crystals, and other random objects

five brain shaped sculptures in plexiglass display boxes standing in the pool at Nathan Phillips Square

a girl and her mother, looking at brain shaped art sculptures on display at Nathan Phillips Square

below: Here, pac man from the 1980’s arcade & video game, gobbles up yellow dots that represent brain cells.   It is artist Orit Fuchs’s way of illustrating the destruction of brain cells in Alzheimers.

a brain shaped 2 dimensional sculpture, red, made to look like a pac man arcade game, yellow pac man gobbling up yellow dots by Orit Fuchs

2 girls and a man looking at sculptures shaped like brains

brain sculptures on display at Nathan Phillips

below:  Brand Emsley’s “From Making to Thinking”, from the Brain Project website: “Toronto’s unprecedented building boom is reflective of the economic shift from the manufacturing economy to the knowledge economy. It is particularly acute in the area known as the railway lands and surrounding area.”

a brain shaped 2 dimensional sculpture, covered with realistic, detailed, drawing of Toronto railway lands with CN tower by Brad Emsley

below: On the left, “The Routine Ride” by Antonio Caballero and on the right, “Beautiful Mind” by Romero Britto

two brains on display, public art, sculptures, one by Antonio Acabbero and the other by Romero Britto

A description of all the brains, plus information about the artists, can be found on The Brain Project website.
#noblankbrains

 Waterfront Outdoor Photo Exhibit

For the past four years, the Waterfront BIA has organized a photography contest.  East year fifty finalists are chosen.  This year they have organized a photo exhibit of a different kind.  One hundred and fourteen images were chosen from the 200 finalists from their previous photo contests.  These images were used (and cropped!) to make vertical banners, 5 ft x 2 ft in size.   The banners are made of vinyl and the same image is on both sides.

below: You can see many of the banners on Queen’s Quay between Yonge and Bathurst.

Looking west on Queens Quay towards Bathurst street. New TTC streetcar is in the photo as well as a number of condos and other buildings on the north side of the street

Picture of round orange life ring on the edge of the waterfront in Toronto.

Three pictures in one. Each of the pictures is of a banner hanging from a pole outside. On the left is a picture of seagull, in the middle is a picture of two houses and on the right is a winter waterfront scene

A pole with a vinyl banner with a colourful picture of boats. Also on the pole is a street sign that says Yo Yo Ma Lane

looking towards the waterfront. A banner with a picture of the Canadian flag is on a post by a tree in the foreground. The old silos for Canada Malting Company are in the background as is a boat moored beside the silos.

A banner with a picture of a seagull on it. In the background of the banner picture is the CN Tower. In the background of this photo, there is also the CN Tower.

 

below: Sometimes it’s difficult to see the banners amongst all the other things along Queen’s Quay

TTC streetcar on Queens Quay

below: There are also some banners on Lakeshore Blvd between Bathurst and Spadina.

A woman is walking on a sidewalk, away from the camera, beside the Lakeshore Blvd in Toronto. There are a few cars on the road. There are skyscrapers in the background. The elevated highway, the Gardiner Expressway, is also in the picture.

A composite of three pictures, each of a vertical banner hanging from a pole outdoors along a street. One banner is a kayaker in the harbour in front of the Toronto skyline. Another is a sunset over Toronto skyline on a cloudy day

Since 1999 CANstruction has been an  annual contest amongst the GTA design community.  Companies build structures with canned or packaged foods for the benefit of the Daily Bread Food Bank.  These structures are then displayed and judged  before the food is donated.

Photos from some of the entries for this year’s competition:

below: Hunger for Sport, by HDR
Toronto is about to play host to both the PanAm Games and the ParaPan Games.  These games are a celebration of individual triumph and collective national achievement.  Food fuels the body and the mind and is needed for individuals to strive for their goals.  But many go without.

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - a white curved wall with two symbols representing sports on it

below: Feed People not Trash, by Cannon Design
Canadians waste food, a lot of food.  Expired food and uneaten leftovers become organic landfill.  This sculpture is an oversized trash can overflowing with food; about 12,000 of these sized trash cans of edible food are thrown out in Canada each day.

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - an oversized trash can overflowing with cans of food. The trash can is made of gray coloured cans

below: Food for Thought, by rebanks pepper littlewood architects inc.
Hunger can have a profound effect on the brain and as a result, how we learn, behave, and make decisions.  Healthy and energetic minds need complete and balanced meals.  This sculpture represents the brain with each lobe being a different food group and in turn, each food group is different coloured can.  Fruits and vegetables are green, grains are yellow, dairy is blue, and meats and other protein sources are red.

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - close up of a representation of the brain with a string of little lights representing the brain at work

31% of food bank recipients are children.  By feeding hungry mouths with good food we ensure that minds are nourished and the brain can focus on learning, developing, and growing.

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - close up of a representation of the brain with a string of little lights representing the brain at work

below: Constructing Hope, by PCL Constructors Canada with Entuitive
Biomimicry uses nature’s patterns and strategies to find solutions to human challenges.  Here we have a calla lily, a resilient and beautiful flower modelled from nature.   In turn, society can learn from nature to work together using available resources to ensure the survival of all.

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - a calla lily in yellow and blue cans

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - close up of the yellow and blue calla lily

below: Can the Force Be With You, by GHD Inc.

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - a large picture of Darth Vader's head

below: On the Front Lines of Hunger, by Aercoustics Engineering Ltd.
“The war against hunger is truly mankind’s war of liberation.”
It’s a war with many fronts.  Food inequality impacts 13% of Canadian households especially people with disabilities, single people, and single parent households.
“United we can stop hunger in its tracks.”

in the trenches, a sculpture made of cans on display as part of a competition

below: Oppor[tuna]ty by Ryerson University Dept of Architectural Science
The tuna fish is one of the most common sources of protein and other nutrients such as Vitamin B12 but it is still inaccessible and unaffordable for those who struggle financially.  The completed head and tail of this structure represent those who live comfortably.  The middle section, the “bare bones” of white beans, represent the nutritional issues faced by those who live on cheaper low protein foods.

a large fish skeleton, a sculpture made of cans on display as part of a competition, representing oppor Tuna ty

below: Fortuna, by BA Consulting Group
Fortuna was the ancient Roman goddess of fortune and symbol of the random and unpredictable forces that control human life.  This fortune cookie is made of over 9000 cans of tuna.

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - a large fortune cookie made of 9000 cans of tuna

below: Shifting Perspectives, by Quadrangle Architects
Objects seen from different angles appear differently.  So to with situations and challenges such as hunger in midst.

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - close up of a representation of the brain with a string of little lights representing the brain at work
sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - from one angle this sculpture is a red wall with the word HUNGRY written on it in block white letters

sculptures on display that were entered in a contest in support of the Daily Food Bank, sculptures made of canned food in a theme pertaining to hunger awareness - a red folded wall with a white plate, white knife and white fork on it.

 CANstruction was:
→ presented by Design Administration Canada,
→ supported by Consulting Engineers of Ontario and The Design Exchange, and
→ hosted by Cadillac Fairview Corp.

Information and photos from previous years entries on CANstruction website.