Posts Tagged ‘umbrellas’

Well, that was quite a weekend.  An April winter storm with snow, sleet, ice pellets, freezing rain, and even some just plain rain.   The streets were icy and the sidewalks were slushy and wet.   Chunks of ice have fallen off roofs, tree branches have broken off with the weight of the ice that formed on them.  And then there was the wind that blew hard.   Of course I went out!

hazy, blurry picture of a person walking with an umbrella up Yonge street with other people, cars, wet sidewalk,

below: Dressed in our April finery. Black parkas.

people walking in the rain, downtown Toronto

below:  There is a small, but interesting, exhibit at the Toronto Reference Library at Yonge and Asquith that I wanted to see.  It’s called ‘Toronto Revealed’ and it’s in the TD Gallery on the main floor.   It features drawings and paintings of Toronto’s past.

sign in the window of the Toronto Reference library re the display at the TD gallery, Toronto Revealed, pictures and paintings of Toronto in the past

below: One of the paintings in the exhibit is this one, ‘Cherry Street Hotel’ by Gerard Lazare (1978).  The Cherry Street Hotel was built in 1890 at the corner of Cherry and Front Streets.  It later became the Canary Restaurant (1965-2010).  The building is still there but it stands empty.

painting of the Canary restaurant on the corner of Cherry and Front streets

below: There was a display of small artworks by Nicholas Hornyansky (1896-1965), including this one of St. James Cathedral (1938).  Hornyansky was born in Hungary and immigrated to Canada in 1929.  He is known for the etchings and aquatints (another print making technique) that he did of Toronto buildings and landscapes.

small framed painting of Saint James cathedral in Toronto, by Nicholas Hornyansky, painted in 1938 .

below: Most of the paintings were very realistic (documentary) except this one – a wacky view of Bloor Street looking west from Yonge towards Bay by Carlos Marchiori, painted in acrylic in 1976.   Even then, it is fairly true to reality.  The darker tower on the right is on the NW corner of Bloor and Yonge.  Stollerys store (the low building on the SW corner) is long gone.

bright painting of city landscapre, Yonge & Bloor, bendy buildings, cars as coloured blobs on the streets, puffy clouds in bright blue sky, by Carlos Marchiori

While I was at the library, I wandered around and took a few pictures of its vast open spaces.  It was warm and dry!  I was expecting to be told to put my camera away, but no one seemed to care.

interior of the Toronto Reference Library from the fifth floor, semi circular tables, reddish carpet, open concept architecture, rows of books,

below: Most were too busy working to notice.

looking down an aisle between two stacks of books (book shelves), a woman is sitting at a table studying and writing, there is a window behind her

below: One more picture from the ‘Toronto Revealed’ exhibit is this painting of the intersection of King and Jarvis by Vernon Mould.   It was painted in 1979.  Was gas really 20 cents a gallon in 1979?  No! That was the year that prices went metric and a litre of gas was 20 cents.    I came back to this picture because I chose to chase down that intersection to see what it looks like today.

painting, in mostly brown tones of a three story building at the corner of King and Jarvis, Toronto, with a small gas station across the street, sign says gas 20 cents, 2 gas pumps,

below: Et voici, same intersection, approximately the same angle.  There is now a building (with a Second Cup on the ground floor) where Mould would have stood.   By the looks of it, the three storey brick building on the NE corner has been fixed up since 1979.  So glad to see that it hasn’t been replaced by a glass condo tower!

intersection of King and Jarvis, looking north, three story brick building,

below: I wanted to find out more about the building, so I googled Sportsman’s Shop and I found a wonderful old picture of it from the 1970’s, obviously taken before it was renovated.    Apparently, it was fixed up in the early 1980s.

old black and white photo of the Sportsmans Shop at 150 King East in Toronto, three storey brick building

photo credit: Gary Switzer, source: Urban Toronto

below:  The next photo was taken as I stood on the same corner of King and Jarvis, but pointing my camera in different direction – looking west on King towards St. James Cathedral.  This is the eastern limit of the King Street streetcar project which is why the multicoloured barricades block part of the righthand westbound lane.

looking west on King street from Jarvis, St. James Cathedral and park on the right, downtown towers and office buildings in the distance, rainy day, TTC streetcar,

below:  These women are waiting in the wrong place.  Although the city changed the location of the streetcar stops along King Street, the bus shelters haven’t been moved yet.   At least they were (sort of) out of the rain.   They soon realized their mistake.

below: Looking back, the prerequisite photo of a TTC streetcar through a rainy day window.

looking out the back window of a streetcar, rainy day, raindrops on the glass, another streetcar is passing by

It’s always better to end a blog post on a happy note, right?  It may be a dream (I hope not!) but spring can’t be too far away.  April showers bring May flowers, right?  On my second warm up stop I saw this cheerful, hopeful drawing tacked to a wall.   It was one of many on the wall, all the work of Maihyet Burton.  They were at the Artscape building at the Distillery District.

a pen and ink drawing of spring flowers, poppies, in blues and purples, and fiddleheads in bright green

below: Headed home again.

two people with their back to the camera wait on the subway platform as a train arrives

Don’t put away your boots and hats yet!

It’s been a while, I know.   Part of my excuse – the holidays got in the way.  But more importantly, it’s been very cold with bitter winds adding to our discomfort.  The very cold days are beautiful with their bright blue skies.  Although I have walked once or twice in -20C weather, the pictures here are from a warmer day when it was possible to take pictures without freezing my fingers off.  Unfortunately, in the winter warmer often means greyer.  I thought of calling this post “In Search of Winter” but that would be silly as no search is needed, it hits you in the face and it surrounds you.  Everyone is talking about the cold.

below: Winter in the city isn’t always picturesque.  Salt and sand and snow mix together to form slush.   Brown ugly slush, especially on the roads and sidewalks as seen here on Queens Quay West.  Of course, if you live in Toronto you are already well aware of this!

dirty slush along the streetcar tracks on Queens Quay

below: H2O park now has a pink #TOwaterfront sign (sculpture?) to go with its yellow umbrellas and white Muskoka chairs.  The weakened winter sun tried to break through the wall of clouds.

H 2 O park on Toronto's waterfront with yellow umbrellas over white Muskoka chairs on what is a beach in the summer but is covered with snow in the picture. A pink sign that says #TOwaterfront made of pink wood that is supposed to look like pieces of driftwood

below: The other morning there was a small group of Toronto firemen all dressed for the icy water as they practiced winter rescue procedures.  Both men were tethered to the shore.

two Toronto firemen in their yellow cold water suits, life jackets on, and tethered to ropes, practicing breaking through ice and then recovering by makng their way to stronger ice, practising ice rescues

below: Just a few footprints in the snow. I wasn’t the only one walking this way but there certainly weren’t any crowds.

a few footprints in the snow on a bridge

below: A cold and lonely barbecue, as well as one under wraps, waiting out the winter on the dock.

barbecues under tarps on snow covered docks in partially frozen harbour

below: Access to the docks along the waterfront was discouraged. It was easy to get out there but I suspect that if I’d fallen in I would have gotten in trouble, and not just from being wet. I wonder how thick the ice was there?

a danger do not enter sign and yellow caution tape across a dock on the waterfront, windswept snow, old railing,

below: Instead of comic relief, we have colour relief!

close up of porthole and red wall on boat in the harbour, railing and rope knotted, both with snow on them

below: Ducks on ice.  Have you ever seen a duck land in the snow?  It looks exactly like a landing in water but with a much shorter skid at it comes to a stop.   Or maybe that was obvious because how else would a duck land?

ducks onthe ice on Lake Ontario in the foreground, Canada Malting Co silos in the backgrounds

below: More ducks… ducks swimming in the small patch of open water.  There can’t be much food for them these days.

snow covered docks with one small snow covered boat, harbour, some ice and some open water

tall ship in harbour, with condos along Queens Quay in the background

snow covered boats on snowy docks, bottom of larger boat is in the background.

ice covered ropes that are holding a boat tied to the shore

below:  Lake Ontario with the Port Lands and the Toronto Islands in the background.  Windswept snow on the ice.

frozen harbour, Lake Ontario, with some snow covered docks

Stay warm everyone!

And don’t lose your gloves!  There are so many lost and lonely gloves out there… I hope that this one isn’t yours because if you’re like me, you lose at least one every winter.  I wonder they end up? In landfills?  … where archeologists of the future will dig up all these single gloves and mitts and wonder what it says about our society?  [smile!]

one black wool glove that has been dropped on a slushy wet sidewalk in winter

Another nice day, another ramble.

below: My starting point the other day was Castle Frank subway station (Bloor Street East, close to the top of Parliament Street).  This station opened in 1966 although the entrance that you see in the photo was an addition that was added only a few years ago.

photo taken from sidewalk on north side Bloor Street East, just outside of Castle Frank subway station, looking west towards downtown. Subway station in the foreground, high rise buildings in the background

below: An interesting round window in the station entrance.  You can see part of the window in the picture above, peaking from around the side of the tree trunk.

a round window with a metal grille inside. Grille is made of trapezoid shapes in a repeating pattern.

below: The subway “tunnel” between Sherbourne and Castle Frank stations isn’t really a tunnel at all.  This view surprised me – I know that I have driven under this structure on Rosedale Valley Road.  I don’t recall knowing that it was for the subway.

Downtown Toronto is in the distance. The subway tunnel between Sherbourne and Castle Frank stations is in the foreground. It's really a covered bridge as it passes over Rosedale Valley Road.

below: “It’s never too cold for rainbow shoelaces.”  Sage advice for the winter time.

words spray painted on a low concrete fence, It's never too cold for rainbow shoelaces.

below: Graffiti under the bridge…  even though I am drawn to bridges I didn’t go down the hill to investigate.  That can be another blog post at another not so muddy time.   This spot can be accessed from the Rekai Family Parkette which is at the SE corner of Bloor and Parliament, tucked in between Bloor and St. James Cemetery.

graffiti under the arches of a bridge, white skull painting, lots of trees, winter time but no snow. No leaves on the trees, brown ground.

below: More graffiti seen from the parkette.

graffiti on the side of a concrete bridge, based on the letter P C and E.

below: St. James Cemetery was opened in July of 1844 at a time when the population of Toronto was around 18,000 and most of them lived south of Queen Street.   The cemetery would have been out in the country but now, more than 150 years later, the cemetery is in the middle of the city.  There are 89,000 interments here including two of my great x 2 (or 3?) grandparents and some of their descendants (they’re not shown in the picture though!).

many tombstones in a cemetery, different shapes and sizes, a couple of crosses, a couple of rectangles with rounded tops, a tall one in the shape of a skinny keyhole, trees in the background, no leaves

below: A little reminder that Christmas wasn’t all that long ago.

a small statue of an angel sitting on a pedestal in a cemetery, a Christmas wreath in green with red bows and brown pine cones is behind the angel.

The fastest route from Castle Frank to Cabbagetown is straight down Parliament Street.  But of course, the direct route is rarely the one that I take.  The area is full of little alleys and lanes and they all call to me.

below: These animals are part of a mural painted in support of Riverdale Farm which is nearby.

on Darling Lane (street sign in the picture), a mural of two horses, part of a larger mural featuring farm animals

below: Reading the news, many newses.

a street art piece, a bench and man are painted on a wall, the man is holding a newspaper that is a made of paste ups of the word news many times.

below: In Flos Williams Lane there are a number of stenciled words.  “Guilty until proven rich” I first saw here a couple of years ago.  I don’t walk this lane very often so I’m not sure how long ago the other sayings appeared.

below: Like most walks, there were interesting windows to be seen.

two windows on a red brick house with stone foundation, basement window and first storey window. The upper one has a red curtain

below: …and doors too. A very bright orange door!

a very bright orange front door.

below: But unlike most walks, there was a giant gecko or lizard.

a life like model of a giant green gecko on the small roof over a window of a pet store.

One of the appeals of Cabbagetown is the number of older houses, many of which are heritage buildings.

below: This house was built in 1858 and its first resident was Charles MacKay, a customs official who lived here from 1858 to 1865.  The infill line of townhouses behind it are a much more recent development.

an old historic brick house with black and white trim, a small statue in the front yard, set back from the sidewalk, large tree,

below:  Cabbagetown has more of these ‘workers cottages’ or ‘gothic cottages’ than anywhere else I’ve walked.   This arrangement of three identical houses in a row is especially rare (but not unique, at least not yet).

a row of three gothic cottages joined together, all pale yellow with dark green trim

below:  This cottage is in the middle of another threesome but they are not identical.  The yellow door on the pale blue house is a wonderful colour combination.  A little bit of sunshine.

a gothic cottage painted pale blue with white trim,also a bright yellow front door.

below:  Even though it has been renovated and an addition added to the back, this house still retains some of its historical roots.

a renovated and modernized gothic cottage with an addition out the back.

below: And more history…  I was attracted to this building by the beautiful double doors.  Once I was close to the house, I noticed the ghost sign hiding behind the tree branches. The Daily Herald is no longer but it the mark it made here remains.   A mysterious mark though because I can find no record of such a publication.  In fact, probably “the sign had been part of a play or film that the home’s owner was involved in and he installed the sign on an act of whimsy.”  (source, bottom of page)  You gotta love whimsy!

an old brick building, two storeys, now a house, with double doors in a dark teal colour. Ghost sign above the window that says Daily Herald

below: Whimsy you say?  Bright pink flamingo whimsy in a store window.   They look like they’re ready for a rainy day.

three bright flamingo heads as umbrella handles in a shop window. Pink flamingos and pink umbrellas.

below:  There were also some store windows that were a bit more serious.

store window, selling statues of religios figures, many statues of Mary and Jesus.

below:   I think that Carlton and Parliament is one of the most colourful intersections in the city and I always enjoy passing this way.  This is the view if you are standing in the middle of Carlton street and looking east towards Parliament.

looking down Carlton street towards parliment, brick stores directly ahead, some cars on the street,

below: This large colourful mural on the wall of Cabbagetown Corner Convenience,  NE corner of Carlton and Parliament, has become a landmark since it was painted by Ryan Dineen in 2005.

mural on the side of a building in cabbagetown. people in old fashioned clothing plus swirls of colour. street scene beside it, people on sidewalk walking in front of stores.

below: The 506 Carlton streetcar makes its left turn from Parliament.   It’s never a quick and easy turn.  In fact, it’s usually frustratingly slow.

TTC streetcar, Carlton car, turns from Parliament street onto Carlton, stores, sidewalk and people in the background, reflections in street car windows.
And in case you were wondering, yes, you can find cabbages in cabbagetown. This big one is on the Cabbagetown mural on the side of the LCBO building.

painting of a cabbage in a mural

And yes, there is a lot more to Cabbagetown than this…
and I will use that as an excuse to return another time!

Nathan Phillips Square, Saturday 19 November

A cold wet day.

people at a rally protesting against Donald Trump as President of the USA, a wet rainy day, looking out over Nathan Phillips Square with city hall, the 3D Toronto sign and many umbrellas

below: Stop the Fascists

a woman holds the American flag upside down.  The words stop the fascists have been added to the flag with tape .  a protest rally at Nathan Phillips Square on a rainy day

 three women at a protest against Donald Trump as American president, each with a protest sign, dressed for the rain.

people at a rally protesting against Donald Trump as President of the USA, a person in a mask like a mardi gras mask, and holding a green sign that says Georege Soros move on

a mother helps her daughter by holding an umbrella over her while the daughter holds a protest placard that she's made herself.

below: Make America Love Again

three women at a protest rally at Nathan Phillips Square in Toronto, protesting against the election of Donald Trump as American president, each holding a sign, Still with her, no, and make america love again.

below:  We all share one atomosphere, one ocean, one earth

people at a rally protesting against Donald Trump as President of the USA, two people holding a banner with a 3D model of the earth with a sign that says We all share one atmosphere, one ocean , one earth, fossil fuels imperil all

below: Demand accountability from elected officals – stand up for the disempowered.

people at a rally protesting against Donald Trump as President of the USA, a young couple in clear rain ponchos each holds a brown cardboard sign

below: Greenpeace

people holding a large greenpeace banner at a rally to protest against Donald Trump

below: We are the Storm and we will leave light in our wake.

people at a rally protesting against Donald Trump as President of the USA, a man holds up an orange sign with black letters that say We are the storm and we will leave light in our wake

below: “Not fit for president, wake up America!”

people holding protest signs, talking to the police on duty at the rally to protest against Donald Trump

below: Nathan Phillips Square during the rally.

people at a rally protesting against Donald Trump as President of the USA, a wet rainy day, looking out over Nathan Phillips Square with city hall, the 3D Toronto sign and many umbrellas

below: Canada rejects bigotry

people at a rally protesting against Donald Trump as President of the USA, a woman in a yellow raincoat holds two signs, one says Trump FYI Canada rejects bigotry and the other says Trump no to you divisiveness, sexual assault and racism

below: Nastywoman hashtag in action

people at a rally protesting against Donald Trump as President of the USA, a woman wears a sign around her neck that says Love trumps hate #nastywoman

below: Can’t comb over sexism and bigotry

people at a protest rally a woman holds a sign that says You Can't comb over sexism and bigotry

below: Trans Lives Matter and Love Trumps Hate

people at a rally protesting against Donald Trump as President of the USA, a young couple with placars. One says Trans lives matter and the other is painted in rainbow stripes with the words Jove Trumps Hate written on it.

below: One giant step backwards

three women at a protest rally against Trump and US politics, holding a sign that says 1 giant step backwards. Nathan Phillips Square, Toronto, rainy day

below: With butterflies, hearts and sparkles

a person wearing a v for venegence mask with little red hearts, a buttefly and some sparkly bits added to it.

below: Bersih demonstrators join the rally. This group is calling for the resignation of Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak

a small group of people posing for a picture with the Malaysian flag and some protest signs that say berish.

below: Trump Election: Byproduct of Obama/Clinton Neoliberalism – Bolshevik Tendency

bolshevik tendency group with signs at a protest rally

#trumprally | #lovetrumpshate | #nastywoman

This year’s Dyke March (the 20th!) was an energetic, supportive, and positive celebration once again.  It was led as usual by motorcycles and then Dykes on Bikes.  Numerous groups and individuals walked and there was a good turnout that lined the sidewalks to watch the parade pass by.  Colourful.  Joyful.

many motorcycles as part of Dykes March, downtown Toronto

two people hugging, one in black pants and knee high boots, motorcycles parked around them.

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto - one cyclist in a tight red body suit is yelling in celebration, other cyclists around her

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto

blog_crochet_banner_ribbon_parade

two women on a red motorcycle in a parade

girls and women marching in a dyke march

a young woman with magenta coloured hair and a t shirt that says "Kiss me i'm gay"

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto - a woman carries a large crocheted umbrella with a multicoloured fringe

women walking in a dyke march

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto - two women dancing

topless bare breasted cyclists in dyke march

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto - a woman in a turquoise top with her arms raised, a rainbow flag in one had, another woman is grinning

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto - a group in various leather clothes, some topless

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto - Dykes on bikes, parade has stopped so the cyclists have put down their bikes and many of them are lying down, crowds on the sidewalks watching the parade

two women carrying a crocheted banner for Dykes on Bikes, walkers in a dyke march in Toronto

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto - Latino, or Spanish speaking group with a baner that says" Estamos Aqui"

spectators sitting on a sidewalk. A woman with flowers in her hair and pink sunglasses as well as white knee socks. The man beside her has a fedora on.

Two people holding hands, one is wearing a pink T shirt that says "Women want to have FUN - damental rights". Closely cropped picture

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto -

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto - a woman with a red boa is dancing and talking to other women at the same time

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto - a large group of cyclists on Yonge Street, Dykes on bikes

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto - two young women walking together, one is holding a sign that says "love is proud"

spectators on a sidewalk watching the Dyke March, one woman has a sign that says "Marching for those who didn't make it"

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto - a woman on a motorcycle with a rainbow flag

two groups, one Muslim and one Jewish, walking in a Dyke March

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto - a couple hugging, a couple wearing long colourful beads

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto - Dykes on bikes, one woman on a bike has one arm in the air,

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto - a young black woman is shouting as she raises her sign in the air

black dog all dressed up for pride, walking in a dyke march

a woman with very short purple hair, a pink sleeveless top, and many tattoos, is taking a picture with her phone of a group marching in the Dyke March

a woman with a rainbow string bikini stands beside a well tanned man in white shorts and no shirt as they watch women marching in the Dyke March

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto - a woman on an E-scooter in short white shorts and a red shirt and red pointy hat

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto - a CTV reporter is walking backwards as he is being filmed following the Dyke March

spectators on the sidewalk watching a parade. A man with a camera, a woman with her shopping, a man with a pink boa, another man with a pink shirt and white pants

people watching a parade

kids riding on bikes with their mothers in a dyke march

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto -

walkers in a dyke march in Toronto - two women wearing T shirts that say "This parade is gay", as well as a topless woman holding a sign that says "We are not targets". Another sign says "Learn the difference between sex and gender"

a woman is carrying a crocheted rainbow banner for a dyke march, behind her a larger group is carrying a crocheted banner that says diversity

a woman in dark sunglasses stands beside a banner with sections for different famous lesbian women - Mary Woo Sims, Lynne Fernie, Betty Baxter, We Wha, Gertrude Stein,

crocheted banner for dyke march is lying on the pavement. A woman is sitting on the kerb and she is crocheting

#pride | #prideTO | #prideToronto

Pride Week 2015

Most of these photos are from the Dyke March on Saturday, both of the people walking in the parade and the people who came out in the rain to watch the parade.  And rain it did.  But there were still lots of smiles and lots of laughter. 

 

Three young women standing in the rain as the watch a Dyke march parade.  One is wearing a red poncho and one is holding a sign that says " Can't rain on my parade"

Three women are holding a large banner that says 'Dyke March Toronto 2015' that has been crocheted and sewn together.

Group of women riding bikes in a parade on a rainy city street as part of a dyke march, pride week event.

motorcycles in the rain, dyke march parade, down Yonge St. in Toronto

A group of women walking in a dyke march on a rainy city street.  Two of the women are carrying a banner that says "Fifty + Toronto"

A couple in blue garbage bags as rainwear are standing in front of a billboard on which there is a picture of a woman.
pride dyke march, dykes on bikes, woman in bright yellow raincoat rides a bicycle that is pulling a trailer

pride week, dyke march, woman on a bike is holding a sign with a red AIDS ribbon and the words 'friends for life'

motorcycles in the rain, dyke march parade, down Yonge St. in Toronto

Two men watching a parade on a rainy afternoon.  One is holding a camera and is standing behind a concrete barricade.   The other man is standing on the barricade and cheering and clapping.

A group of women on bikes are riding in a dyke march, pride week.  The march has temporarilty stopped and three photographers are standing in front of the riders taking their picture.  The woman in front is topless and she has drawn a picture of a bike on her breasts.

pride week, dyke march, a grey haired woman is carrying a pink sign that says 'G'day from Australia' and behind her is a couple of young women sharing a gren umbrella

Three people on a sidewalk.  A man in a black and grey hoodie who is looking at the two women beside him.  One woman is in a multicoloured tutu and an orange sweatshirt.   She is looking at her phone.  The other woman is wearing an ornage skirt and a yellow sweater

Two men in colourful and glamorous drag are standing on a sidewalk in the rain.  They are each holding a clear umbrella.  A girl is standing beside them with an astonished look on her face.

A line of people walking in the Dyke March, pride weekend.  Two women are holding a rainbow flag.  antother woman is pushing a stroller.  Two of them are holding rainbow umbrellas.

motorcycles in the rain, dyke march parade, down Yonge St. in Toronto
A group of people standing on a sidewalk in the rain as they watch a parade.   They are standing in front of a Mind Games store .

Pride week, Dyke march, a woman is carrying a pink sign that says "womens strength and courage has nothing to do with mens balls"

a woman in a red jacket with a red purse and a pink umbrella

Rear view of two well built men who are wearing just their briefs.  they have words painted on their backs, "Hero fit" and "be a #diesel hero".  They are standing in front of a Trojan booth, pride week display.

A couple is at an ATM on the side of the TD Canada Trust bank.  A large rainbow has been painted around it for pride week.

Two women, both smiling.  One is holding an umbrella and has a bow in her hair.  The other is also under the umbrella.

Sugar Beach on a November afternoon.

A time when you have your choice of seats to sit and watch the clouds race past and the wind whip the branches of the trees around.

Sugar beach with its white chairs and pink umbrellas, looking over the sand towards Lake Ontario

Late afternoon beside grey Lake Ontario.

Sugar beach with its white chairs and pink umbrellas, there are no people here, and the lake is looking a little grey.

The first hint of sunset appears in the sky.

Sugar beach with its white chairs and pink umbrellas is in the foreground and the city is behind it.

Darker skies over the city as the rain clouds pass by.

Sugar beach with its white chairs and pink umbrellas is in the foreground. The Toronto skyline is in the background, including the CN tower.

With the city behind.

Sugar beach with its white chairs and pink umbrellas, with a four storey building behind as well as some willow trees

The low sun of late afternoon is reflected off the umbrella stands as well as the glass of the Corus building behind.

Sugar beach with its white chairs and pink umbrellas,