Posts Tagged ‘cameras’

A trip to Toronto Islands on a sunny spring day.
Photos and stories – an eclectic mix of history and nature that resulted from wandering around the eastern portion of the islands.

below: From the ferry, looking toward the glass and steel of the city.

sail boats in Inner Harbour of Lake Ontario, in front of the Toronto skyline with highrises and skyscrapers also ship moored at Redpath Sugar refinery

Toronto Islands is a collection of at least 12 small islands.  In the early years the island archipelago was really a peninsula of sandbars and ponds; it was connected to the mainland by a narrow strip of sandy shoreline. This landform was created over centuries by the action of waves, winds and lake currents – washing away portions of the Scarborough Bluffs and depositing this material to the west in a five-mile-long hooked shape. This process of natural “landscaping” continued until the spring of 1858, when a particularly powerful hurricane created a channel four to five feet deep through the peninsula.  By June of that year, the Eastern Gap was a waterway, and the Toronto Islands came into being.

below: On the ferry between the city and Centre Island.

people lined up along the front railing of a ferry from Centre Island to the city of Toronto, looking at skyline and taking picture of it. Toronto is in the background.

The first buildings on the islands were the Blockhouse Bay garrison built in the 1794 by the British at Gibraltar Point – it included a blockhouse and storage structures.  A second blockhouse and a guard house were built soon after, only to be destroyed by the Americans in the Battle of York in April 1813.   The lighthouse at Gibraltar Point built in 1809 still stands (sorry, no photo).

In 1833 Michael O’Connor built a hotel on one the islands.  He used a horse-drawn boat to ferry customers across from the mainland to his hotel.  At that time, there was still access by road but it was a toll road.  In 1836 it cost sixpence for every four-wheeled carriage drawn by two horses.  Smaller ‘vehicles’ paid less.   In 1858 the hotel (now Quinns Hotel) was destroyed during the same hurricane that turned the peninsula into an island.  The hotels were destroyed but the islands remained popular.  With no road access, ferries were needed and many people ran private ferry services until they were bought out or amalgamated into the Toronto Ferry Company in 1892.  It was privately owned until 1926 when it was purchased by the City of Toronto for $337,500.

ferry, ceiling is full of orange life jackets, railings along edge, Lake Ontario, benches to sit on but no people

blue abstract from two blue doors with cut out where handle should be

Many houses and businesses, (hotels, restaurants, bowling alley, laundry, theatre etc) were established over the years from Hanlon’s Point in the west to Wards Island in the east.   Today, residences are only in the eastern section of Wards Island and on Algonquin Island.

The Ward’s Island community began in the 1880s as a settlement of tents. Up until then, that eastern end of the islands was mostly wetlands.  The first summer colony on Ward’s in 1899 consisted of just eight tenants, each of whom had paid a fee of $10 rent for the season. The number of tents grew each year.  In 1913, the city felt it necessary to organize the community into streets. The evolution from tents to cottage structures progressed in stages with the building of floors, the addition of kitchens and then porches, resulting in the creation of the homes.

two houses on Wards Island, small wood housses, one bright blue and the other is white

grey wood siding on house with white door and small porch. Two yellow and metal chairs on the porch

In 1953 the municipal government changed their policy toward the Toronto Islands landscape and its residents. Businesses were removed and the systematic demolition and burning of homes began.  More of the islands became parkland.    There are 262 houses on Wards and Algonquin Islands today, down from about 630 residences on all the islands.  The last of the Lakeshore houses was removed in 1968 but traces of them still remain.

wood boardwalk along the foreground of the photo with a concrete path leading away from it, into an overgrown area

part of old concrete breakwater, once there was house here, number 170 embedded in the concrete

below: The pier on the Lake Ontario side.

metal fence in the foreground, beach, pier and Lake Ontario in the middle and background

below: Sandbags along the shore.  Last spring there was a lot of flooding here and the island was closed to visitors – sort of.  Ferries didn’t run and the park facilities were closed.  The islands are very flat and low so it doesn’t take much extra water to flood.

large white sandbags along the shore, beach on the other side, Lake Ontario in background with a row of rocks as breakwater a short distance from the shore, sign on the beach

sign fallen over and under water, surrounded by rocks, Lake Ontario

below: There is a small amusement park, Centreville, on Centre Island.

CN tower in the background, people on the Skyline ride at Centre Island passing over water, with large boats docked farther up the river

below: Island transport that can be rented if you don’t want to walk.

people cycling in 2 quadricycles, a four wheeled bicycle like vehicle, on paths,

the orange and white wall tile pattern of Pizza Pizza with a red bike parked in front of it.

below: Boats moored QCYC (Queen City Yacht Club), one of the three yacht clubs on the islands.

sailboats moored at a wood dock, QCYC

below: Sakura trees in bloom.   The trees were donated by the Sakura Project.  The aim of this project was to strengthen Japanese Canadian relations by planting cherry trees in visible locations across Ontario.   Between 2000 and 2012,  3,082 trees were planted at 58 locations.  The trees on Centre Island were planted in 2011.

path, sakura (cherry) trees on either side with their pink and white blossoms, other large trees around them with pale green of new leaves

below: Catkins from a red alder tree.  They almost look like raspberries packed tight together.

red fuzzy blossoms droop from the end of a tree branch

new yellowish green flowers on a tree, also leaf buds just opening,

ants in the bud on a tree

below: An early family of Canada geese.

family of Canada geese, 2 adults and 7 or 8 fluffy little goslings swimming in the water

below: The pier at the eastern end of Wards Island is bad need of repair.  To the right is the entry into the Eastern Channel (or Eastern Gap).

broken concrete pier into Inner Harbour of Lake Ontario, with Toronto skyline and CN Tower in the distance

below: Looking over to Algonquin Island.  Once upon a time this island was just a sandbar.

waterway, orange life ring and ladder on one side of the river, houses and docks, and boats on the other. r

two people standing on the shore of Center Island, looking at the Toronto skyline and taking pictures of it.

and back to the mainland.

people exiting a ferry, from above

Maybe you thought that the duck was a waste of money  or maybe you thought the duck was a fantastic idea.    Maybe you didn’t like the duck because it wasn’t Canadian enough for a Canada Day celebration (the Canaduck!) or maybe you didn’t care about such things.   It certainly generated a lot of discussion even before it arrived – who hasn’t heard about the duck?  Who didn’t have an opinion about the duck?   It spawned the hashtag #whattheduck, a play on WTF.

big yellow duck, side view, people on shore

The noise has now all died down.   The 150th birthday party is over.

I don’t think that I am alone in thinking that the duck was the star of the Redpath Waterfront Festival and that the festival organizers have no regrets about spending the money on the duck.

below: The yellow duck was moored by HTO beach (that’s the one with the yellow umbrellas) for the duration of the July 1st long weekend.   It smiled through rain and shine.

large inflatable yellow rubber duckie sits on the water, Lake Ontario, at the waterfront in Toronto

below: It was a popular duck and it attracted about a million people. People of all ages.  It was about 6 storeys tall so even if you couldn’t get close to it, you could still get a good view.

a litttle girl is being held up by her father, she is pointing at the duck and looking at her mother who is taking a picture of it

below: Millions of photos were taken with (and of) the duck. It was a willing subject and it stayed still – it was good at holding a pose.   The trick was to get a selfie that didn’t have lots of other people in it!   He was a bit grubby – maybe too big for a bathtub? – but no one cared.

three people are taking selfies in front of the big yellow duck

below: Not everyone was excited to see the duck!

an older man is sleeping on a white muskoka chair and under a big yellow umbrella at HTO beach in Toronto, crowd of people standing behind him

below: One last look at the duck.  On Monday evening the duck was towed across Toronto Harbour to the Port Lands where it was deflated and readied to be sent to Owen Sound for the next port of call on its Ontario tour.

the large yellow rubber ducky is being towed across Toronto harbour

The 10th annual Luminato festival is being held inside the old Hearn Generating Station in the Portlands.  There are many theatrical, musical and visual events and the location itself is worthy of many, many photos.  Rather than try to cover everything in one blog post, I’ve chosen to focus on mirrors and reflections to begin with.    First, there is the giant ‘disco ball’ that keeps light circulating around the massive interior of the Hearn and second,  an installation by Jordan Soderberg Mills features three interesting and entertaining mirrors.

‘One Thousand Speculations’ is the name of the giant ball that is suspended from the ceiling. At 7.9m in diameter, it is the world’s largest mirror ball.   It is the creation of Canadian artist Michel de Broin and was commissioned for the 2013 Luminato festival where it hung from a crane over David Pecaut Square.  One thousand mirrors reflect the light from a spotlight on the floor and as the ball slowly turns, the lights move around the ceiling, walls, and floor of the Hearn.

below: As seen from the ground floor level.

One thousand specualtions, a mirror ball with 1000 mirrors, inside the hearn generating station as part of luminato festival
below: Close up. The top level is quite close to the ball.

reflections seen in the mirror ball, hearn

below: Someone, somewhere, has a picture of his friend ‘holding up’ the giant ball!

one man is taking another man's picture from an angle that it makes it look like the second one is holding up a giant disco ball, reflecting globe with 1000 mirrors on it, inside the Hearn generating station

below: And the reverse angle, from the top looking down.
Lots of irregular shapes of light moving around the space.

mirror ball suspended from the ceiling of the hearn generating station, the bottom of it in the foreground, with the ground floor level of the hearn below. lights reflecting. people looking up

The Luminato website describes the mirrors involved in the installation by Jordan Soderberg-Mills as “anaglyphic mirrors that play with physics, perception and colour”.   Now you’re probably wondering what anaglyphic means.  It’s a word that comes from the science of 3D pictures.  There is no concise definition!  It is a picture that consists of two slightly different perspectives of the same subject in contrasting colours that are superimposed on each other, producing a three-dimensional effect when viewed through two correspondingly coloured filters.  Phew.   In practice, it makes for a mirror that is fun to play with…. and people did play!

below: As seen from the upper level, three vertical mirrors and four circular mirrors.

looking down onto the ground floor of the hearn generating station at luminato festival, three large vertical mirrors and some round mirrors on two tables. A few people looking at the mirrors, some other people standing around.

people interacting with an anaglyphic mirror at the 10th luminato festival, hearn generating station

people interacting with an anaglyphic mirror at the 10th luminato festival, hearn generating station

people interacting with an anaglyphic mirror at the 10th luminato festival, hearn generating station

people interacting with an anaglyphic mirror at the 10th luminato festival, hearn generating station

people interacting with an anaglyphic mirror at the 10th luminato festival, hearn generating station

people interacting with an anaglyphic mirror at the 10th luminato festival, hearn generating station

people interacting with an anaglyphic mirror at the 10th luminato festival, hearn generating station

people interacting with an anaglyphic mirror at the 10th luminato festival, hearn generating station

As you all know, the TTC is replacing their older streetcars with new longer Bombardier streetcars.   Or at least they are trying to 🙂  Because they are longer, they don’t fit into existing “garages”, hence the new Leslie Barns facility.  Located on Leslie St., south of Queen, it is the new streetcar “home”.  It is where streetcars are parked, maintained and repaired.  It has been in operation since Nov 2015 but the first chance the public got to peak inside the finished complex was at Doors Open on the 28th of May.

below: While waiting for a streetcar at the corner of Queen and Broadview on the way to visit the Leslie Barns, I saw this renovated TTC streetcar from the 1950’s.

An old restored TTC streetcar, maroon and yellow, on Queen St. East

below:  The streetcar tour involved riding a new streetcar through a maintenance bay in the building and then around the parking lot out back.

People at Doors Open in TOronto, at the TTC LEslie Barns streetcar facitlity, lining up for , or just getting off of, streetcar tours, riding the new streetcars around Leslie Barns

A group of people inside Leslie Barns streetcar facility, standing aside to make way for a new streetcar that is taking other people on a tour.

people riding in a new streetcar, photo taken from the outside, most of them are waving

A man in black T-shirt and black cap is taking a picture of people riding in the new streetcar, inside Leslie Barns at Doors Open

below: Exterior, parking space for at least 100 streetcars

the massive concrete parking lot for streetcars with all the overhead wires. The building that houses the workshops and cleaning and office for the ttc is in the background.

below: Special bays have been constructed with space for workers to access both the underneath and the top of the streetcars.  Because the cars have been designed to ride low, a lot of their workings such as the HVAC and propulsion systems are built into the roof of the car.

the back of a new streetcar as it passes through interior of Leslie Barns streetcar facility, a large, tall interior space with lots of pipes

A streetcar sits in a repair bay of the Leslie Barns, space underneath the streetcar for workers to go down and work on the underside of the streetcar.

below: It’s a big space!  …. 17,510 square metres (188,500 sq ft) in fact.

interior of Leslie Barns streetcar facility, a large, tall interior space with lots of pipes

below: A spic and span shiny paint room

interior of the paint room at Leslie Barns, where streetcars go to get painted.

below: A myriad of colour coded pipes

A myriad of pipes running up walls and across the ceiling, blue, pink, red, grey, all colour coded, interior, Leslie Barns

below: There were renovated vintage streetcars on display.  On the left is a 1921 Peter Witt streetcar and next to it is a PCC streetcar from the early 1950’s.

a number of people waiting to go inside old renovated vintage TTC streetcars

below: Interior of a refurbished Peter Witt streetcar with its wood trim.  The Witt cars were built for the newly formed TTC in 1921.  They entered service on Broadview in October of that year.  By 1923 they were operating on seven routes.  The last Witt streetcar was retired in 1963.

A young boy stands in the back of an old restored ttc streetcar. A black and white picture of an old street scene has been put across the back window to show you what the view out the window might have looked like at the time the streetcar was functional. Old ads on the upper part of the interior, wood trim

below: Looking out the window of a PCC streetcar built in 1951.  PCC stands for Presidents’ Conference Committee, which was a group of operators from the USA and Canada  who got together in 1938 to design a new electric railway car.  By the late 1950s, the TTC owned the largest fleet of PCC’s in the world.  The last one was retired in 1995.

A young boy wearing a hat looks out the window of an old restored streetcar while his father takes a picture out the window

below: Streetcar wire maintenance truck.

a special TTC truck sits outside Leslie Barns TTC facility on Doors Open day, the truck is designed to run on streetcar tracks and is used to repair tracks and wires. There are people looking at the truck

#DOT16 | #TTC

Pillow Fight at Nathan Phillips Square
in celebration of International Pillow Fight Day 2016

people in the midst of a large pillow fight at Nathan Phillips square in celebration of international pillow fight day -

people in the midst of a large pillow fight at Nathan Phillips square in celebration of international pillow fight day - 2 asian women hit each other with pillows while other people watch

people in the midst of a large pillow fight at Nathan Phillips square in celebration of international pillow fight day - a young man with two yellow pillows looks intensely at a man with a pillow raised over his head

feathers go flying as pillows break during a pillow fight amongst a crowd of people

people in the midst of a large pillow fight at Nathan Phillips square in celebration of international pillow fight day - a man wearing a suit and dark sunglasses participates in the pillow fight

people in the midst of a large pillow fight at Nathan Phillips square in celebration of international pillow fight day -

people in the midst of a large pillow fight at Nathan Phillips square in celebration of international pillow fight day - a number of young people laughing

people in the midst of a large pillow fight at Nathan Phillips square in celebration of international pillow fight day - a boy closes his eyes and ducks his head as two pillows come his way

two young women leaping at each other as they try to hit each other with pillows

two young boys swing pillows at each other - people in the midst of a large pillow fight at Nathan Phillips square in celebration of international pillow fight day -

people in the midst of a large pillow fight at Nathan Phillips square in celebration of international pillow fight day - a young girl swings a pillow

young people participating in a large outdoor pillow fight

people in the midst of a large pillow fight at Nathan Phillips square in celebration of international pillow fight day -

a woman holds her hands up by her head defensively to ward off pillows being swung by two girls

people in the midst of a large pillow fight at Nathan Phillips square in celebration of international pillow fight day - a young man with earmuffs and a woman wearing a face mask

young men swinging pillows at each other in a large pillow fight

people in the midst of a large pillow fight at Nathan Phillips square in celebration of international pillow fight day -

people at Nathan Phillips square on a cold day watching a pillow fight, spectators,

people in the midst of a large pillow fight at Nathan Phillips square in celebration of international pillow fight day - an Asian woman swings a pink pillow at a man wearing a ski mask

people in the midst of a large pillow fight at Nathan Phillips square in celebration of international pillow fight day -

people in the midst of a large pillow fight at Nathan Phillips square in celebration of international pillow fight day -

people in the midst of a large pillow fight at Nathan Phillips square in celebration of international pillow fight day - a woman with long red hair hides under her pillow as she walks through a crowd

people in the midst of a large pillow fight at Nathan Phillips square in celebration of international pillow fight day - a young woman is on the shoulders of a man as they pass through a crowd during a pillow fight

people in the midst of a large pillow fight at Nathan Phillips square in celebration of international pillow fight day - a woman in a pink and blue striped hat smiles at a man as she readies to through a pillow at him

a person in a bear costume waves to the camera as a boy in pyjamas holds a pillow

people, adults and kids, swinging pillows at each other in a large pillow fight

people in the midst of a large pillow fight at Nathan Phillips square in celebration of international pillow fight day -

asian young man in suit and tie and glasses is laughing and smiling as he swings a pillow in a pillow fight outdoors with many people

a young woman holding a pillow and screaming at another young woman

blog_little_kids_pillow_fight

an asian woman with her hair dyed auburn has a pillow over her head as she emerges from a crowd at a pillow fight

#pillowfight | #pillowfighttoronto

Rob Ford 
City councillor and former Mayor of Toronto
May 1969 – March 2016,
Funeral procession from City Hall to St. James Cathedral, 30 March

 below: For two days Rob Ford lay in repose at City Hall where people could pay their respects.  And many did.  Yesterday, the line up wound around the corner of City Hall as people waited their turn.  Some people loved him; some people hated him.  Possibly there were those who were indifferent.

The corner of Toronto City Hall with a long line up of people waiting to get inside.

This morning there was a short procession from City Hall to the noontime funeral at St. James Cathedral.

below: After arriving at City Hall, Doug Ford greets the crowd.

Doug Ford walks from a black limo to a crowd of people standing behind barricades in front of City Hall. They have their arms outstretched towards Ford, ready for a handshake and greeting.

Although the procession was scheduled to begin at 10:30, it didn’t start until close to 11:30.  A group of people waited at Nathan Phillips Square including some of Rob Ford’s supporters.  I overheard a conversation between two men who were discussing what they thought of politics and politicians, most of it negative.  At one point they declared that all career politicians should be kicked out of office.  I thought to myself, you mean guys like Rob Ford?  Wasn’t he a career politician?

A middle aged man holds a banner that reads Ford Mayor over his head, beside him is a woman also holding a Ford Mayor sign. On the back of her jacket are a number of stickers in support of Ford
A man walks up the concrete ramp at City Hall, beside him on the wall is written in chalk, Heavenbound. Thankyou. May God bless your family.
Two people in front of the Archer sculpture at Nathan Phillips Square, a man and a woman. The mans back is turned towards the camera. He is wearing a black jacket with the words 'Home is Toronto' in white letters.
About 20 or so people were holding a large flag made of a couple of  Canadian flags and all the provincial flags stitched together.   It was a very diverse group of people, diverse in age as well as in ethnic background.   They were joking about whether or not they were going to be on the front page of the ‘Sun’.   We shall see!

A large flag made up of the Canadian flag and the provincial flags all joined together, held around the edges by many people, view from under the flag, showing many legs and feet, and more of the crowd in the background.

A lone cameraman stands on the upper level at City Hall outside, taking pictures of the people below.

below: A woman finds a quiet place to sit and wait.

An older woman sits on a bench inside a TTC bus shelter. A fire truck is behind her.
below: The police were in position, ready to start, long before the procession began.  So was the media and it was a very large media presence indeed.

A young man holds a camera and microphone, aimed at the start of a parade.
below: The Toronto Fire Department had a large Canadian flag on display at Queen and Bay streets, near the beginning of the procession route.

A very large Canadian flag hangs from the cranes of two fire trucks at the corner of Queen and Bay streets in downtown Toronto

A fireman holds a rope that is attached to the corner of a very large Canadian flag. A firetruck is behind him

Three people stand on the sidewalk in front Hudsons Bay store windows. A man with a hard hat, a man with hands in his pockets, and a woman in long black coat. A couple of bikes are parked there too. The theme of the store windows is Inspired.

A funeral procession for Rob Ford passes along Queen Street on its way to St. James cathedral, photographers are in front, a police guard is walking beside it.

ceremonial firemen marching in a funeral procession in front of Hudsons Bay store in Toronto

a small group of people wait on the sidewalk, watching down the street, one man with a camera in hand.

a woman holding a ford nation sign above her head walks in a procession across King street

A funeral procession for Rob Ford passes along Queen Street on its way to St. James cathedral, photographers are in front, a police guard is walking beside it.

People walking in a procession including a man holding a Rob Ford mask

a small group of people wait on the sidewalk, watching down the street, one woman with a camera in hand.

A woman in hoodie and sunglasses holds two small Ford Nation flags as well as a bobble head doll of Rob Ford as she walks in his funeral procession down Yonge Street

An older woman waves a little Ford Nation flag while the man behind her has used Ford Nation signs in lieu of a scarf. He is wearing reflective sunglasses too.

A black man with beard and moustache turns to look back, three young men in work clothes stand against the storefront beside and behind him.

below: Trying to keep the people, most with cameras, off the streets.

A police man in a yellow jacket and on a bike is trying to get the crowd to stand back as he rides beside a hearse with police guard as it drives down the street.

below: This guy may have been filming the crowd (and me) but he didn’t look away from his phone.

A man and a woman are each holding the side of a Ford Nation banner as they walk with a group of people in the procession to Rob Ford's funeral

a woman wearing sunglasses and holding two things, a photo of Rob Ford, and a small Ford Nation flag

below: The crowd in front of St. James cathedral

The hearse carrying Rob Ford's body arrives at St. james cathedral and the casket is taken out and carried into the church with police honour guard

a woman holds a framed photo of a selfie of her and Rob Ford

An older man sits on a bench in front of St. James cathedral while other people stand around, watching the procession for Rob Ford's funeral

A man with two little white dogs on a leash stands in front of St. James cathedral along with a crowd of people there for Rob Ford's funeral

people behind a barricade, with a policeman in front. One of the people carries a sign that reads Peoples Mayor

a young person sits on the grass, resting against a tree while other people stand around

From King St., the view of St. James cathedral front doors, lots of people and police in yellow jackets in the picture as well as a man walking his bike

As I was walking away from the cathedral, a woman approached me.
She pointed towards the church asked me if I knew what was going on there.

added later:  I was going to discard this photo but then I noticed the man in the mask.
Who wears a mask to a funeral procession?

a man in a black and white mask stands behind some women waving ford nation flags.

Today was the first day of TIFF.

A middle aged Asian woman poses in front of the orange tiff 3D sign on King Street. A girl is sitting on the corner of it, looking off the picture to the right.

Happy 40th birthday to TIFF!

Three people walking past a bright poster for TIFF's 40th year. A burst of pink and orange colour around the number 40, all on a black background.

King Street is closed between University and Spadina for a few days so I thought I’d wander through the TIFF party to see what was happening.   I played ‘follow the crowd’.

below:  Who are we looking for?  I wasn’t sure, but hey, why not wait and see?

A crowd of people is waiting by the side entrance to the TIFF Lightbox theater.

Close up of a policeman's face. He is wearing reflective sunglasses and the crowd is reflected in them.

below: Widmer Street was closed to traffic

line of people waiting by a barricade at the end of a street. Queen Street west stores are in the background.

…. except for a few black Cadillac Escalades.

two lines of black Cadillac Escalades, looking down the lines to a group of people behind a barricade with a policeman standing with them.

below: I’m not sure who he was but he seems to be taking pictures of the crowd
(or is he taking a selfie?)

A short man is taking pictures of a crowd (directly towards the camera) or else he is taking a selfie with a lot of black Cadillac Escalades behind him.

 below: Sean Bean (aka Ned Stark in Game of Thrones – thanks to the woman beside me who knew who he was) in the burgundy coloured vest.   As it turns out, the movie ‘The Martian’ had just finished playing at the TIFF Lightbox and many of the cast members had been in attendance.

The actor Sean Bean (Ned Stark in Game of Thrones) is walked to a car with a security guy in the lead and a couple of other people with them.

below:  I think it’s Danny Glover; I could be wrong

actor Danny Glover being directed towards a car.

below:  Jessica Chastain, also in ‘The Martian’ worked the crowd.  She was generous and let many people take selfies with her.   Not in the picture, the three security guards who stayed close to her the whole time.   Also not in the picture, any selfie with me!

A group of fans in a crowd. One man is taking a selfie with the actress Jessica Chastain. Other people are taking photos of them.

Once Jessica passed by me, I moved away from the crowd and headed back along King Street.
I didn’t far when I spotted another, smaller, crowd.

below:  Can’t be a badass security guy with a shaved head and dark glasses!

Two security guards stand on steps outside a building. One has a dark suit on, the other is wearing jeans and a grey vest. Both have shaved heads and dark sunglasses.

 I struck up a conversation with one of the Escalade drivers.   He told me that Matt Damon was due to come out in about 20 minutes after some sort of press event.  That’s when I clued in to the fact that the people who got into the big black SUVs two blocks back had only been chauffeured to this place!  Since I missed Matt Damon the first time around, I decided to stay.   Besides, the crowd was friendly and chatty and I was having a good time.

blog_groupies_straining

below: Sebastien Stan walks to a car after signing a few autographs.   When he first came out the door, there were a few, “Who’s that?”.  The answers were almost all, “Captain America”.

blog_groupies_sebastien_captain_america

blog_groupies_window

blog_groupies_policeman_crowd

  below: Naomi Watt made an appearance too.
Hey, she’s not in “The Martian”, but I didn’t know that at the time!

Actress Naomi Watts signs autographs while a security guard looks on.

Okay, okay, you all just want to know if Matt Damon let me take his picture.

below: One burly security guard stepped in front of me and almost destroyed the moment.
Note the shaved head. No sunglasses though.

The back of the head of a security guy. His head is shaved except for the top part. He is wearing a wire. Matt Damon and another security guy are out of focus in the background.

Matt Damon is directed towards a vehicle by a driver and a security guard.

Apparently George Clooney, Sandra Bullock and Helen Mirren, were at TIFF today.
I missed them; they’ll have to wait until next time.

#TIFF15