Posts Tagged ‘heritage’

I walk past Davisville Junior Public School fairly often…. or should I say, I used to walk past it.

I didn’t think about it too much until I heard that it was going to be demolished – or was it going to be saved?  Maybe I should take some photos of it as apparently it has some architectural value, an early 1960’s Modernist building.   Then, back in November, a construction fence appeared around the property.   One of those metal wire temporary fences that you see all over the city.  So much for saving the building.

 

Photos from November:

west end of Daviville public school with it's coloured panels on the upper floor, basketball nets in front, pavement

side entrance of Davisville public school before it was demolished, modernist archtecture brick building,

back of part of Davisville public school through chainlink fence, before demolition

crooked chainlink fence posts at the corner of a schoolyard, with metal construction fence inside that, school in the background, large paved area in front of the school

The building was also home to the Metropolitan Toronto School for the Deaf as well as Spectrum Alternative School.

red roses stuck in a chainlink fence as a memorial tribute to the school that is being demolished, MTSD 1962 to 2018 where MTSD is Metropolitan Toronto School for the Deaf.

below: Notice on the fence, permit to remove 21 trees.   A new elementary school is being built on the site.  In the meantime (for 2 years), Davisville Junior Public is being relocated to Vaughan Road in what was previously the Vaughan Road Academy.  Originally, the plan was to build the new school on the property (there was a large playground) and then tear down the old (Globe & Mail Feb 2017)

city notice posted on fence, permit to remove 22 trees. Notice that 44 trees will be planted once the building on the site (new elementary school) has been demolished

below: I past by the site for the first time in a few months and discovered that most of the school is now demolished.  Only a small portion by the front entrance remains and I suspect that that won’t be around for much longer.

small part of a school remains, debris scattered on the snow, digger at work in the background, apartment building in the distance

broken fence, plywood fence, and the remains of a school that is being demolished

old front entrance of Davisville public school, lots of snow, broken walls as it is in the proces sof being demolished.

Toronto is undergoing a massive amount of redevelopment these days.  When I walk around this city I see older buildings that I often wonder about – are they going to still be around in 2 years?  5 years?
….that is what happened yesterday when I was on Yonge St. between Bloor and College.  I took a few pictures, just in case these buildings disappear in the near future.

row of three storey buildings on Yonge St.  Brick buildings with storefronts on the ground floor.

Looking south (and a bit west) from just below Bloor Street.

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At the intersection of Yonge & Wellesley.

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We’ll see what happens in the next few years!

1655 Dupont Street, a large red brick building that once housed the Viceroy Rubber Company factory.  Now it is Planet Storage with over 10,000 square feet of self-storage space.

The building, now designated as a heritage building,  has had it’s structure preserved although some of the lower storey windows have been boarded up. The east side of the building backs onto the Toronto Railpath and it has been decorated with graffiti at ground level.  An old storage tank at the southeast corner of the building has been painted bright green to match the Planet Storage logo.

Viceroy still makes hockey pucks and other rubber items but at a newer plant on Weston Road, under the name of Allied Viceroy.

Three storey brick factory building.  The windows in the lower storey are covered with orange wood. There is graffiti along the lower five or six feet of the building.

looking south along the side of the building

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Looking north along the side of the old Viceroy rubber factory building.  A red brick building with large windows.  There is graffiti on the bottom five or six feet of the building.

Looking north along the West Toronto Railpath.

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a chainlink fence is in the foreground.  Behind the fence is a tall green storage tank (the top part of it is not in the picture.  One wall of a three storey red brick building is in the background.

At the southwest corner of the building and behind a fence is a tall green storage tank.

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bottom two storeys of a red brick factory.  The lower storey has the windows boarded up and painted orange.  There are graffiti tags along the bottom of the building.

tags under the orange

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An open window covered with metal bars and a metal screen.  Graffiti on the walls too.

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a large tree is in the foreground and it is casting a shadow over the wall of a red brick building that has graffiti on it.

In the shadows.

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Large windows on a red brick building.  The window frames are metal and they are rusty.

Rust, writing, and reflections

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an old door is painted bright green and on it is a piece of street art of a man in a black and white striped shirt.  A blue and white graffiti tag is on either side of the door.

on the green door.

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a black and white drawing of a woman with binoculars sitting beside a train track waiting for a train that is in the distance

S is for Siderodronophilia, a proclivity to become aroused by watching or riding trains.

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The sun is shining on a red brick building with large windows.  Graffiti tags are on the wall.

Tags in the sunshine.

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graffiti of many white fingers in at least three rows of four.  The fingers have eyes and their noses look like the number two.

many fingers with twos.

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Standing alone in a vacant lot on Sterling Road is the Tower Automotive Building. It was built by Northern Aluminium  in 1920 and at some point became the property of Tower Automotive who used the site to build car parts.  In 2005 it was declared a heritage building but it was closed shortly thereafter when the company declared bankruptcy.

 

The ten storey Tower Automotive bulding.  In the foreground is the land left vacant after the demolition of the sheet casting machining buildings in 2010.

The ten storey Tower Automotive building. In the foreground is the land left vacant after the demolition of the sheet casting machining buildings in 2010.

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Looking up the spine of the building.  North side of Tower Automotive.

Looking up the spine of the building. North side of Tower Automotive.

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along the west wall

walking along the west wall

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Faccio Sempre la Brava, translate from the Italian as I always do the good.

Faccio Sempre la Brava, translates from the Italian as, I always do the good.

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Loopy Le Loop with tags

Loopy Le Loop with tags

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graffiti of a girl with a watering can.  The girl has a tottoo of an anchor on her upper arm.  She has purple hair and she is wearing a hat with a feather in it. She is also wearing a green skirt. .

two wire gates.  One has a sign on it that says 'protected by' but the name of the company is obscured by a tag

ungated

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interior, doors

interior, doors

 

When I was researching this building, I found a site that has a collection of great photos of the interior of the building that were taken in May of this year:

jermalism.blogspot.ca/2013/05/abandonment-issues-tower-automotive.html

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Fourth Annual Art Spin Exhibition,
Tower Automotive Building, 158 Sterling Rd.,
Aug 29 – Sept 1, 2013

18 artists, one old vacant heritage industrial building.

Interesting lighting.  Interesting use of the space.  Interesting relationships between the installations and their surroundings.

I have not included photos of all the art in the exhibit.  My apologies to the artists whose work I haven’t shown.

looking at 'Sound the Alarm' by Caroline Larsen' with the video installation 'I,I,I,I' in the foreground

looking at ‘Sound the Alarm’ by Caroline Larsen’ with the video installation ‘I,I,I,I’ in the foreground

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'We Are Happy' by Michael Toke.  Like a visit to the dentist's office.

‘We Are Happy’ by Michael Toke. Like a visit to the dentist’s office.

a group of people looking at a piece of art.  They are in a large open space that once was a factory.  Concrete and brick walls.

The painting on the wall to the left is ‘Exit Enter’ by Celia Neubauer.

'Sterling Caer Observer' by Noel Middleton

‘Sterling Caer Observer’ by Noel Middleton

A sculpture that is composed of three tall vertical pieces of shiny metal.  A yellowish brick wall is in the background.

‘Untitled’ by Jinny Yu. Three shaped pieces of metal by brick wall.

 

artist:  Mary Grisey

art installation in front of an old green door.  There is a lot of frayed rope.

Art installation with a lot of rope, especially frayed rope.

‘Floating in the Eye of the Storm’ by Lois Schklar.

  wire sculpture

Wire sculpture in the foreground with an oil painting in the background

part of a wire sculpture including a star

part of a wire sculpture showing a little gold trinket in the shape of a hand

‘Stillnessence Vivarium’ by John Oswald. 

This installation lent itself to a many interpretations.

projection of life sized picture of a group of people

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life sized projection of a group of people, male and female, young and old,

more information about Art Spin  http://www.artspin.ca

a wall, part concrete and part tile.

The video installation ‘Melting Bricks’ was in small room where it was shown fairly high up on the wall. It was the only source of light in the room. I focused on the relationship between the room and the light when I was taking pictures of it. (my apologies to the artist as I seem to have forgotten his/her name).

 

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In 1913 the first of five Wychwood “Barns” were built by the city of Toronto as a streetcar maintenance facility. Streetcars accessed the site from the mainlines on St. Clair Ave., which is just to the north, via tracks on Wychwood Avenue.

There were five barns built from 1913 to 1921 as industrial buildings.  They are brick structures, two storeys high with an interior steel structure that was exposed. The facility remained part of the TTC until 1992. The City of Toronto currently leases the site to Toronto Artscape Inc., a not-for-profit organization that develops and operates space for the arts, at $1 a year on a 50 year lease.

Barn 1 has been converted into a private live-work studio and housing for community artists, while Barn 2 was made into a community gathering space, including a theatre. Barns 1 & 2 became a covered street that is two storeys high, 60 metres long, and 10 meters wide. Barns 3 and 4 are private-public spaces where non-profit organizations can operate.

Interior of the present day Wychwood Barns, central part. Historical photos of Toronto streetcars hang over the doors on the right.

Interior of the present day Wychwood Barns, central part (barns 1 and 2). Historical photos of Toronto streetcars hang over the doors on the right.

A greenhouse and community gardens are located in Barn four.  The roof was removed from Barn 5. All that remains is the steel structure that forms the arcade.

A large number 5 hangs over the remains of the fifth barn.

Barn number 5

part of an old wall showing the brick details.

Exposed interior wall

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Sunflowers growing in the community gardens in barn 4.

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