Posts Tagged ‘Cherry St.’

women in pink tutus running in a half marathon

Run Like a Diva,
5 km run and a half marathon in the Port Lands.

below: Pink tutus were given to all those who registered to participate in the event.

two divas in their pink tutus near the start of the RunLike a Diva event on Cherry st in the Port Lands

1700 people ran the 5K event and almost as many (I think) ran the half marathon.

a group of women running on Cherry St in the Port Lands as part of the Run Like a Diva 5k run.

The original plan was to hold this event on the Toronto Islands but with this spring’s flooding, the run was moved to the mainland.   It was a charity event in support of Rethink Breast Cancer.

two women running together in the Run Like a Diva half marathon run, both are wearing pink tutus, they are connected with a piece of rubber that they are each holding on to. on the right is Diva Chelsea, bib number 1100.

two women wearing pink tutus in the Run Like a Diva half marathon . one of them is the Greatest Diva, bib number 1110

a groupd of women in the Run Like a Diva event, bib number 2794 in pigtails and bib number 2413 running beside her.

a black woman in sunglasses, head band, and pink tutu runs. Bib saya I am a Diva, and bib number 936

pink tshirts an dpink tutus, Run Like a Diva, runners running down Unwin street

a young woman, a spectator at a 5km run, holds a sign that says If Trump can run, so can you

below: It was great to see a few men joining the fun, complete with their pink outfits.

a man is dressed in pink for the Run Like a Diva event, pink wide brimmed hat, pink t-shirt and pink tights as well as pink tutu. Bright blue shoes.

a father and daughter, both in pink tutus run in a 5k race, Run Like a Diva, other runners in the background

two women smiling as they run in the Run Like a Diva half marathon. on the left is Diva Debbie, bib 808 and on the right is bib number 1266, Diva Sandy

running towards the finish line in a 5k and half marathon event

a couple, male and female, holding hands, both wearing pink tshirts and tutus as they participate in a 5 km run

below: Near the end of the event, participants were given pink boas and shiny tiaras to wear with their tutus.

two volunteers in bright yellow t-shirts hand out pink boas to race particpants as they come close to the finish line

divas in their pink, tutus, boas and tiaras

a young woman in a pink T-shirt, runner 3127, Eldiva, puts on her tiara and pink boa as she nears the end of the Run Like a Diva

a group of women running in the Run Like a Diva run, all in pink tutus and many in pink t-shirts, laughing and cheering as they come close to the finish line in their pink boas and tiaras

below: Coming to the end!

a group of runners comes to the end of a half marathon, a group of people are behind a fence watching them and encouraging them.

young man is picking up orange traffic cones and putting them into the back of a truck

#runlikeadiva | #divastoronto

Within the past week or so, the fences around the new Canary District have come down.  Toronto’s newest development is now open to the public so I thought I would check it out.

I started my walk from the streetcar stop at King and Sumach.  Walking down Sumach Street I passed the metal fence that separates the school property from the street.  This stone building was built in 1887 as Sackville Street School and it has been used as a school ever since.  At the moment it is home to Inglenook Community School.  The fence with it’s double layer of metal – rusted in the back and shiny in the front – is interesting in the daytime but even more so at night when it is lit with a series of lights located between the layers  and near the base of the fence.

public art on Sumach St., rusted metal and shiny metal fence with cut outs, looking across the street at it, with older stone building behind it.

When I took the above picture I was standing on the new streetcar tracks that run south from King Street.  The tracks are ready and the wires have been installed.  Streetcars will begin servicing the route in June as part of route 514.  No map or schedule appears on the TTC website yet but apparently this route will run between the Dufferin Gate Loop and the new loop on Cherry Street via King Street

below: Looking north from Eastern Avenue at the new streetcar tracks on Sumach Street.

looking north on Sumach Street from Eastern Ave at the new streetcar tracks. They are blocked by 5 large black and orange traffic cones as well as a large do not enter sign. Overhead wires for the streetcars are in place.

At Eastern Avenue, Sumach Street becomes Cherry Street.   The new Cherry Street YMCA is on the east side of the street.  The sidewalk is wide but at the moment the branches of the young trees are at face level and you have to be careful where you walk.

looking south on Cherry Street from Eastern Ave, past the new Cherry Street YMCA on the left and all the new trees that have been planted.

below: The bright red detailing on the YMCA building continues over the entry way.  Part of the new residences for George Brown College peak out from behind.

roofline over the entry of Cherry Street YMCA with it's bright red colour. Corner of George Brown College building is in the background.

Front Street now has wide sidewalks.  None of the businesses have moved into the ground level retail spaces yet but the signs in the windows suggest that a number of cafes, restaurants, and food stores will soon be opening.   A couple of public art pieces are also on the sidewalk.

below: ‘Lampposts’ by Tadashi Kawabata

A tall art installation as public art on Front Street in the Canary District, Lampposts by Tadashi Kawabata, construction from many different styles of street lamp posts all arranged in a cluster

below: Looking up from underneath the artwork.

looking up at the lights from underneath the artwork,Lampposts by Tadashi Kawabata

below: ‘The Water Guardians’ stand over a soft squishy playpad.
It was designed by Jennifer Marman and Daniel Borins.

'Tje Water Guardians', A tall art installation as public art on Front Street in the Canary District, 3 stylized abstracted human forms with legs in an arc shape over a squishy playpad in green, blue and white. The blue represents water. The green parts are raised slightly in bumps.

below: There are a lot of little design elements that have been incorporated into the this development including what I think is a bench.  With a light underneath?

A curved black metal bench on a sidewalk

below: The sidewalk around the trees is made from two colours of brick.  The opening for the tree is just the right size to collect garbage.  Whether or not these traps get cleaned out remains to be seen.

square hole in the brickwork of the sidewalk to allow a tree to grow. The hole is shallow, a few cm. deep but it collects garbage such as empty coffe cups and discarded papers that blow in the wind.

below:  The Canary District is not yet finished as this sign clearly states.

A large plot of land with rocks and newly planted trees in a grid. An orange and yellow sign advertises the Canary District. It also says that this land is slated for future residential development

below: The sculpture ‘No Shoes’ by Mark di Suvero is now accessible.   The artwork was completed in 1967 and originally installed in High Park.   In 2013 it was renovated and moved to Corktown Common.

The sculpture 'No Shoes', red metal beams and wood poles, very large, stands in a park with some buildings in the background.

below: The pavillion at Corktown Commons in the distance.

The pavillion at Corktown Commons i the background as seen through the bottom part of the sculpture 'No Shoes'

below:  The Bala Pedestrian Underpass, aka the south exit from Corktown Commons, goes under the railway tracks and merges with the Don Landing part of the Lower Don Valley trail.  The artwork was designed by Rolande Souliere and is part of the StreetARToronto initiative.   A yellow Lovebot and a happy orange monster have been added to the scene too!

pedestrian underpass under railway tracks that has been painted in bright stripes, yellow, red and black. The left of it is a large yellowlovebot and to the right is a sign with a map and a description of the Don Pathway, part of the Pan Am Path.

below: Nature in the city.  Birds of a different feather.  On the Don River, just south of Corktown Common a pair of swans is nesting.  One of the swans was swimming a short distance away while the other was sitting on the nest.   Cars pass by on the Don Valley Parkway unaware of the domestic scene below them.

A swan is sitting on a nest in the Don River, it is beside the Don Valley Parkway, a busy road in Toronto, two cars are passing by above the swan.