Posts Tagged ‘memorial’

The Trans Rally and March, first of the Pride parades was last night (Friday).

 

a young man in a white sleeveless shirt in a parade, holding a sign that says #love always wins

below: If you were driving on Yonge street last night, perhaps you got stuck in traffic. Northbound cars on Yonge were stopped to allow the parade to cross from Bloor to Yonge. The parade continued in the southbound lanes which gave the stuck drivers and passengers a front row seat.

Cars coming north on Yonge street are stuck because they have to stop for a parade that crossed Yonge street, the Trans parade then marched south on Yonge street beside the traffic. A woman takes a picture out the window of her car.

Last year it rained for the Trans March and in previous years the turn out was low.  Whether it is because trans issues have been in the news a lot lately, or because the trans community is more visible, or because of other reasons, there were more people walking than usual.

parade coming down Yonge street, cars stopped on the right, a flag on the left, one woman holding a sign that says We celebrate our children

guys walking in a trans parade on Bloor street holding signs that say "We are #orlando, we will always remember you RIP"

A man in butterfly pink sunglasses is making a face as he blows bubbles, the man beside him has a large beard and he's laughing as he blows bubbles too.

a woman in an orange dress holds a sign that says "Hearts not parts", she has her arm around a young man in a black baseball cap and sunglasses.

people walking in a parade on Bloor street in Toronto including a man dressed all in pink and a man with shiny magenta leggings and a rainbow tie dyed top

two men in a pride parade with wigs on, each carrying a rabbit

an old motorcycle and sidecar painted splotchy orange with a person wearing a pink bra sitting in the sidecar. Parked, waiting for the start of a parade.

a boy waits for the start of a parade. He is carrying a sign, dark blue lettering on magenta, that says I have a sign.

a man in a zebra striped dress and a bright pink wig, in a parade, another man is beside him holding a sign that says US anti-trans bathroom bills are full of shit, no more hate

two small dogs on leashes, walking in a parade

trans parade on Bloor Street, many people walking and holding signs, "Support Trans Families". One person with a rainbow flag on their back. one girl with a bright pink boa.

two older guys dressed up for trans parade, one in a glittery top and the other in a pink fishnet top, both in motorized scooters, one with a rainbow flag draped over the scooter, the other with big plastic flowers.

A button that says "Sex, it's what we do".

people walking in a parade including a woman in a jean jacket and a frilly white skirt and a person dressed in white dress, hat and high heel shoes.

three people stop to pose for a photo as they walk in a trans parade for pride weekend

below:  Dave holding ‘Pulse’ a memorial artwork in honour of those who died at the Pulse nightclub Orlando.  The piece was crocheted by Dave and the Craft Action Collective.

Dave holding up a large crocheted banner with a black and grey ribbon, and rainbow ribbons with the names of each of the people killed at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando.

a group of people walking in a trans march, three in long skirts and two with hats, the middle one is dressed all in purple

a couple in a parade, one has a rainbow coloured boa and the other has a pink wig and is draped in the pink and blue trans flag.

a woman wearing a bikibi top and sunglasses is blowing a whistle and pumping her fist as she walks in a parade

a crowd of people walking down Yonge street in a trans parade as part of Pride, one person is holding a sign that says "I just want to pee"

a woman in a parade is holding as sign that says Biological Sex does not equal gender identity

a person with long hair and wearing a purple t-shirt that says fuck on it, holding a banner in a trans parade

a young woman laughing, she's wearing a stars and stripes bikini top and a straw cowboy hat.

young person in a green t shirt holding a sign that says "We need health care not gatekeeping"

A young woman carrying a sign in a parade. The sign says "Proud of my parent and you"

a couple walking arm in arm in a parade, one has short blue hair and the other is wearing a t shirt with a skull on it and holding a rainbow pride flag

a couple standing beside each other with their backs to the camera, one has a rainbow flag draped over her back and the other has a trans flag draped over his back.

#loveislove | #lovealwayswins

Happy Mothers Day!

I didn’t write this blog post specifically for Mothers Day even though it’s about four women, Mary Pickford, Edith Cavell, Florence Wyle, and Frances Loring.  Just because they are women doesn’t mean that they are mothers, in fact only one is.  Mary Pickford adopted two children.  I also didn’t intend to write a blog post on the merits of motherhood vs childlessness so I am going to say nothing further on the subject!

The first woman can be found at the corner of University and Elm.  Here, there is a a bronze portrait bust of Mary Pickford that was sculpted by Eino Gira in 1983.

bust of Mary Pickford with her hand on her cheek, in front of Sick Kids Hospital in Toronto, red brick hospital behind her in the photo

The plaque beside her says:

Born in 1893 in a house which stood near this site, Gladys Marie Smith appeared on stage in Toronto at the age of five.   Her theatrical career took her to Broadway in 1907 where she adopted the name Mary Pickford.  The actress’s earliest film “Her First Biscuits”, was released by the Biograph Company in 1909 and she soon established herself as the international cinema’s first great star.   Her golden curls and children’s roles endeared her to millions as “America’s Sweatheart”.  She was instrumental in founding and directing a major film production company and starred in over fifty feature-length films including “Hearts Adrift”, “Pollyanna” and “Coquette”.  For the last named film she received the 1929 Academy Award as the year’s best actress.

below: Just up the street, next to one of the entrances of Toronto General Hospital, is a memorial to British nurse Edith Cavell (1865-1915) and to all the Canadian women who served as nurses in WW1.  The memorial  was installed at University Ave and College St. in 1921 but later moved to its present location.

A memorial to British nurse Edith Clavell and the Canadian nurses of WW1, a bronze plaque mounted on a stone tablet. Picture of Clavell between two upright but wounded soldiers.

In memory of Edith Cavell and the Canadian nurses who gave their lives for humanity in the Great War.  “In the midst of darkness they saw light”

Cavell had been working in Brussels when WW1 broke out.  After the Germans invaded Belgium, Cavell helped wounded Allied soldiers escape to the Netherlands.  She was caught by the Germans, charged with treason, and executed on 12 October 1915.  She became the most well known woman casualty of WW1.

The above memorial was designed by Florence Wyle.  There is a memorial to Wyle and her partner, Frances Loring (also a sculptor), in a small park at the corner of Mt Pleasant and St. Clair.

below: bronze bust of Florence Wyle, by Frances Loring

bust of Florence Wyle, a Canadian sculptor, in a park

below: bronze bust of Frances Loring, by Florence Wyle

bust of Frances Loring, a Canadian sculptor, in a park, in the shade of a large tree

below: There are a couple of small statues by Wyle in the same park, including this one.
“Young Girl”, about 1938.

bronze statue titled "Young girl", showing a girl from the thighs up, holding up a cloth that is wrapped around her body but her breasts are bare

Loring and Wyle are responsible for a number of sculptures around the city.  Two of these used to be on the Bank of Montreal building at the northwest corner of King and Bay. It was built in 1887 by architects Marani and Morris and demolished in 1968.  The building featured a series of sculptures representing the Canadian provinces that were done by a number of artists.  Frances Loring sculpted the panels for Ontario and Quebec.  When the Bank of Montreal building was demolished, all of the panels were moved to the grounds of the Guild Inn in Scarborough where they remain today.

Quebec sculpture - A stone relief sculpture from a series on provinces of Canada, originally on a Bank of Montreal building in Toronto. They were rescued when the bank was demolished and moved to the grounds of the Guild Inn in Scarborough. By Canadian artist Frances Loring. A naked woman upright, with a cloth over her shoulders and looking upwards

A stone relief sculpture from a series on provinces of Canada, originally on a Bank of Montreal building in Toronto. They were rescued when the bank was demolished and moved to the grounds of the Guild Inn in Scarborough. By Canadian artist Frances Loring. Ontario is in the picture, as a man surrounded by symbols of industry such as large gears and architectural plans

100 Workers,
aka WSIB (Workplace Safety and Insurance Board) Simcoe Park Workers Monument,
a monument commemorating the workers of Ontario who died in the workplace,
by John Scott and Stewart H. Pollock.

Located downtown on Front Street between Simcoe and John.

low brown granite wall with large brass lettering on the front that says "100 workers".  Along the top of the wall are plaques with names of people who died in the workplace between 1901 and 1999.  The name, year and cause of death is given on each plaque.

 Along the top of the wall are plaques with names of people who died in the workplace between 1901 and 1999.  The name, year and cause of death is given on each plaque.   View looking down the top of the wall.

Each plaque on along the top of the wall commemorates one person, one from each year between 1901 and 1999.   Deaths are from mining accidents, industrial accidents, train crashes, silicosis, asbestosis, and the like.   At the end, there is one blank plaque to represent future accidents.

A black and brass plaque commemoration Marko Pejic who died in 1983

A statue of a workman chiseling out the words on a granite wall.

view from the east of the 100 Workers memorial showing one of the half walls with the words" Remembering our past.  Building a safe future."  A lifesize statue of a workman chiseling words into the wall is on the right side of the photo.

The Ontario Fire Fighters Memorial is near the corner of Queens Park Crescent and Grosvenor Street. 

A short wall of black rock has the names of fallen firefighters carved in it.  In the background is the statue of the firefighter and young boy.

The names of fallen fire fighters are engraved on black stone.

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Statue of a firefighter wearing a gas mask and carrying a young boy is in front of a block of shiny black rock.  In the rock there is a reflection of the statue along with the Ontario flag that is flying nearby.

close up of statue of a firefighter carrying a young boy

Near the corner of Queens Park Crescent and Grosvenor Street is the Ontario Police Memorial.
It was dedicated in May of 2000.

Light grey stone horizontal with 5 panels.  The outer two panels on each side contain the names of the policemen who have died while on duty in Ontatio.  The center section of the stone is the base for two statues - an older and a younger policeman.

The names of fallen Ontario police are carved in the stone at the base of the memorial.

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The two statues on the police memorial as seen from the side.
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close up of young police officer (upper body) at the Ontario Police Memorial
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By the time of Confederation in 1867, one quarter of the population of Canada were of Irish ancestry.  Although the Irish had been immigrating to what is now Canada for a long time, the Irish famine years of 1845 to 1849 saw an increase in the number of immigrants.  Immigration peaked in the summer of 1847;  boatloads of Irish settlers arrived.  Most were very poor and sick.  They landed in a number of places along the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario, including Toronto.   Thousands of those Irish immigrants died in Ontario that summer, mostly from typhus (or typhoid fever).

Ireland Park is home to a memorial in honour of those immigrants. It is on the waterfront between Lake Ontario and the old Canada Malting Co. silos.

view of Ireland Park from the waterfront, and looking slightly north east.  A large shape made of limestone is on the left of the photo and a green space is beside it.  The silos of the Canada Malting Company are visible as is part of the Toronto skyline in the distance.

Sections of limestone fit together in a shape that resembles a boat.

Names are engraved on the sides of the limestone sections.  They are placed such that they are in the gaps between the sections.  At first they are not visible.  It is only when you are close to the stone that you can see the names.

Names in black lettering carved into the side of limestone.

675 names are carved in the stone. These are the known names of the 1000 to 1100 people who died shortly after they arrived in Toronto in the summer of 1847.

 

The park also has seven sculptures by Rowan Gillespie of Dublin Ireland.
The installation is called ‘Arrival’. 

Sculpture of a man with his arms upraised.  He is looking over part of the harbour towards downtown Toronto.

‘The Jubliant Man’ from behind.

close up of one of the sculptures in Ireland Park.  It is a man with his hands clenched in front of him and a worried look on his face.

‘The Apprehensive Man’

 for more information: the Ireland Park Foundation website

Jennifer Kateryna Kobal’s’kyj

I became curious about this story when I encountered two different memorial plaques for this girl in two different churches on the same day.   Jennifer Kateryna, 24 Aug 1989 to 2 April 1996.  She would have been just a couple of months older than my daughter.

memorial plaque on a wall

In 1997 her maternal grandfather erected a plaque in her memory in Metropolitan United church.

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memorial plaque on a wall

There is another plaque, this one at St. James Cathedral, erected by her mother, maternal grandfather and aunt in 1998.

The death of a child is never a happy event, but Jennifer’s story is one of the sadder ones as she was murdered by her father as she tried to protect her grandmother from him. Sadder still is the fact that she had been living with her grandmother as part of the settlement in a custody dispute.

Polson Street Park, where the Don River meets Lake Ontario, was officially changed to Jennifer Kateryna Kobal’s’kyj Park in 1998. This park is at the end of Polson Pier, overlooking Toronto Harbour.

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On the 19th of April, 1904, a large section of downtown Toronto burned for nine hours.

street map of downtown Toronto showing the buildings that were affected by the fire of 1904.

Map showing the area of Toronto affected by the fire of 1904. Bay Street from the Esplanade to Miranda Street (just south of King Street) was the hardest hit.  At the time, this was called the Wholesale District of the city.

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Historical photo of Bay street after the 1904 fire in Toronto.  There are people on the street.  The street is all mud.  There are many burned out buildings on both sides of the streets.  Brick facing of two to four storey buildings is all that remains.

Aftermath, Bay street, April 1904.

In part, because the fire started in the evening, there were no fatalities. As a result of the fire, 5000 people were left without a job.   In 1904, the population of Toronto was about 200,000 so the loss of employment on this scale had an impact on the city.

a very bright and colourful mural on the back of a brick building,  It shows, in reds, yellows ans oranges the burning of a couple of brick buildings, with flames coming out of the windows.

Mural painted on the back of the building on the northwest corner of College St. and Croft St.  (398 College St.), commemorating the fire of 1904.

Demolition of the ruins left by the fire took many weeks.  On the 4th of May, John Croft died while using dynomite to bring down the remains of the W.J. Gage building on Front Street.  His was the only known death associated with the fire.  What is now Croft Street was renamed in his honour.

The east side of 398 College St., at the south end of Croft St., is painted with a mural as a memorial to John Croft.

corner of a building showing parts of two murals.  On the back wall is the mural depicting the fire itself.  On the side wall is a memorial to John Croft.

northeast corner of the building

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1904

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Burned out brick buildings.  All that remains is part of the front facade of these two to six storey buildings.

Burned out buildings, April 1904

The images of the fire’s aftermath are available online.   The originals are kept at the City of Toronto Archives, located on Spadina Road., just north of Dupont Street.

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