Posts Tagged ‘refugees’

Nathan Phillips Square, Saturday June 3

lookng down from the upper level, people at a protest rally at Nathan Phillips square, Toronto flag in the foreground

It was the Centre for Social Justice rally for diversity, strength, and solidarity.  It was an opportunity for people of all religions, races, and orientations to come together and renounce divisions and hate.

people at a protest rally, two people have a bandanas over their faces

below: “First they came for the Muslims, and I spoke out – because I am a Jew”

two men talking at a protest rally. one holds a sign that says First they came for the muslims and I spoke up because i'm a Jew

below: “Freedom of speech is not freedom to hate”

a protest sign in the shape and design of a Canadian flag on the red stripes are words that say Freedom of Speech is not Freedom to hate

below: “Salaam aleikum – Peace be with you”

a woman in a priests collar on, holding a sign that says salaam aleikum peace be with you, being photographed and filmed by TV cameras

below: “Refugees welcome”

people walking in a protest, a large red and white banner in the background, a woman holding a sign that says refugees welcome with a photo of refugees on it

below: “We support our Muslim neighbours and friends.”

people at a protest rally, one is holding a sign that says We support our Muslim neighbours and friends

below: “Toronto against Fascism”

a group of people with red and black bandanas over their faces, holding a banner that says Toronto agaist fascism

a woman with a megaphone at a protest rally, with a red and white banner behind her

 

Refugees in a State Apartment, Jens Ullrich,
Photo exhibit, on a fence outside the Italian Consulate, Dundas West at Beverley.

Part of Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival

photos mounted along the exterior of a wrought iron fence around the Italian Consulate, right beside the sidewalk. The consulate is on old brick house (mansion) from the 1800's - 3 of the photographs, people walking past

Ullrich has taken found black and white photographs of the interior of a large home near Bremen Germany.  The photos were taken in the late 1920’s.    Each photograph is of a different room in the villa and to each picture Ullrich has added  one person.   If you knew nothing about the series, you wouldn’t know that the subjects were refugees.

In each photomontage, singular individuals are depicted—usually with their faces hidden from the camera—within empty yet elaborately fashioned spaces that emphasize their solitude and unstable status. “

photos mounted along the exterior of a wrought iron fence around the Italian Consulate, right beside the sidewalk. The consulate is on old brick house (mansion) from the 1800's - phot by Jens Ullrich of a woman refugee with her face obscured by clothing, sitting on a chair in the bathroom of a large bathroom. also a photo of a male refugee in another room, looking in a large mirror

One of the concepts behind this series of images was the desire to

respectfully capture the disparate emotions of these individuals and their precarious situations.”

photos mounted along the exterior of a wrought iron fence around the Italian Consulate, right beside the sidewalk. The consulate is on old brick house (mansion) from the 1800's - as seen from across the street with pedestrians walking past and cars driving past

photos mounted along the exterior of a wrought iron fence around the Italian Consulate, right beside the sidewalk. The consulate is on old brick house (mansion) from the 1800's - the photos are of refugees that have been photoshopped into old photos of the interior of the apartment of a wealthy person from the 1920's
#CONTACT16

By the time of Confederation in 1867, one quarter of the population of Canada were of Irish ancestry.  Although the Irish had been immigrating to what is now Canada for a long time, the Irish famine years of 1845 to 1849 saw an increase in the number of immigrants.  Immigration peaked in the summer of 1847;  boatloads of Irish settlers arrived.  Most were very poor and sick.  They landed in a number of places along the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario, including Toronto.   Thousands of those Irish immigrants died in Ontario that summer, mostly from typhus (or typhoid fever).

Ireland Park is home to a memorial in honour of those immigrants. It is on the waterfront between Lake Ontario and the old Canada Malting Co. silos.

view of Ireland Park from the waterfront, and looking slightly north east.  A large shape made of limestone is on the left of the photo and a green space is beside it.  The silos of the Canada Malting Company are visible as is part of the Toronto skyline in the distance.

Sections of limestone fit together in a shape that resembles a boat.

Names are engraved on the sides of the limestone sections.  They are placed such that they are in the gaps between the sections.  At first they are not visible.  It is only when you are close to the stone that you can see the names.

Names in black lettering carved into the side of limestone.

675 names are carved in the stone. These are the known names of the 1000 to 1100 people who died shortly after they arrived in Toronto in the summer of 1847.

 

The park also has seven sculptures by Rowan Gillespie of Dublin Ireland.
The installation is called ‘Arrival’. 

Sculpture of a man with his arms upraised.  He is looking over part of the harbour towards downtown Toronto.

‘The Jubliant Man’ from behind.

close up of one of the sculptures in Ireland Park.  It is a man with his hands clenched in front of him and a worried look on his face.

‘The Apprehensive Man’

 for more information: the Ireland Park Foundation website