Posts Tagged ‘horse’

Can you see anything in it?

details of a mural by Jimmy Chiale

The above image, with its location icon, is just a small portion of a large mural by Jimmy Chiale.   You’ll find it in the Bloorcourt neighbourhood, on the SW corner of Shaw and Bloor West to be specific.  ‘Make Good’ it says.

large colourful mural by J. Chiale on the side of a building. Large white letters that say Make Good.

I  think that its fascinating to look at and I suspect that you would see something different in it each time you passed by.   Here are a few more close up pictures of the details in the mural.  Thousands of shapes all outlined in black some of which seem to make eyes, faces, and a bird’s beak.

shapes, lines and patterns in Jimmy Chiale mural

below: …. a totem pole, an owl and a horse head….

totem pole and horse and other details from Jimmy Chiale mural

below:  … and a camera shutter and a fish?
It wouldn’t surprise me if we saw different things!

Bloorcourt mural details, colours and shapes all outlined in black

The first time I saw the latest art installation in the Canary District I was in a car and only got a quick look at it.  I couldn’t figure out what the mess was all about.  It wasn’t until I went back on foot to take a closer look that I could appreciate what the artists were trying to do.

Located at Front and Bayview is the ‘Garden of Future Follies’ by Hadley Howes and Maxwell Stephens (Hadley & Maxwell and the Studio of Received Ideas).  It is a sculpture garden and there are 7 sculptures in this garden.  Each sculpture is a mashup of pieces from different sculptures around Toronto.  Aluminum foil ‘molds’ were used to replicate portions of over 80  different monuments and architectural features.  These portions were then put together in a whole new way.

public art installation on Front St East, various pieces of sculptures put together wrong, people with more than one face, legs in pieces, bronze pieces in 5 groupings on the sidewalk

From an interview with the artists:

“Sir John A. Macdonald’s nose is assembled along with the eyes of artists Frances Loring and Florence Wyle, the chin of Dr. Sun Yat-Sen, and Northrop Frye’s hair; Jack Layton’s smile is one of seven that grace a figure lounging atop a reconstituted mantel from the library at Osgoode Hall; a bell from St. James Cathedral’s famous collection is perched on a cannon from Fort York; while nearby a suitcase from the Memorial to Italian Immigrants acts as a plinth for a collection of hats from various bronze heads.”

Now you can play spot the pieces!  But you won’t find any hockey sticks.

blog_man_three_heads_statue

So far I haven’t seen anyone taking selfies here but I think it would be a great spot for them!

part of a public art installation outdoors created by piecing together fragments of other statues cast in bronze , man and hammer

fragments of horse and feet statues embedded in the sidewalk

part of a public art installation outdoors created by piecing together fragments of other statues cast in bronze

part of a public art installation outdoors created by piecing together fragments of other statues cast in bronze, hands, top of a column and a laurel leaf

part of a bronze sculptture, a naked bum with a hand beside it.

part of a public art installation outdoors created by piecing together fragments of other statues cast in bronze

below: No one will ever call it beautiful, playful yes, but not pretty.

arrangement of statue pieces to form a sculpture garden, Garden of Future Follies by Hadley and Maxwell.

a face is upside down on a statue made from bits and pieces of other statues

 

I was sorting through older photos recently when I discovered some of street art and graffiti that I saw in an alley near Trinity Bellwoods Park.  The photos were taken in February so there is lots of snow in them.  I thought that it would be silly to write a blog post in August using cold and snowy photos so I went back the other day to retake the pictures.

A painting by street artist birdo of a red and blue striped horse like creature with its neck bent downwards so that it looks like it is eating the weeds that are growing between the cracks in the lane.  It is on a garage door, tops of houses can be seen in the background, above the garage

The alley is at the north end of Trinity Bellwoods Park, running behind Dundas West between Montrose and Grace.  The east end of the alley turns north to exit at Dundas West.

a fence that runs down the right side of an alley has been covered with street art

below: This guy, and his chess issues, is at the corner where the alley meets Dundas West.

a low concrete fence is painted with graffiti street art, a green snarling green raccoon creature is acting out against a chess piece, a castle or rook

two street art pictures that look a bit like angry birds

cruz1 street art that looks like leaves or green abstract letters on a fence
3 big round headed aliens by street artist mska, one is green, one is pink and yellow and one is yellow and orange, on a fence in an alley

close up picture of a green leafed vine growing up a street art painting in blue and red with a yellow heart
A garage door in an alley that has been painted with many brightly coloured skulls

A garage door in an alley covered with a street art painting of letters and hand grenades - spud bombs

street art on a garage door in a laneway, dog riding on top of a doghouse, sort of like Snoopy did

below: close up of the dog from the painting above, taken in February

street art of a dog wearing sunglasses and pretending to be a pilot, taken in the winter as there are icicles hanging from the roof

below:  There was one garage that had been painted between February when I first saw it and early August when I went back.  The two photos below show the garage ‘before’ and ‘after’.

The side of a garage in an alley in winter, snow on the ground, two small trees.   The side of the garage is painted green and it has a black and white orak tag on it.

The side of a garage door in summer, two trees and a parked car.  The side of the garage is covered with street art

below:  This Anser face was on the doors of the above garage back in February.
It has since been painted over.

A face painted on a garage door.  bright blue eys, otherwise drawn with just black lines.   by the artist anser

 below:  Blaze Works has painted this where the Anser face was. Always remember.

blaze works tag like graffiti street art on a garage door in an alley

other garage doors

tag like street art on a garage door in an alley

tag like street art on a garage door in an alley Diana Gordito

tag like street art on a garage door in an alley crsy fario, killa wales, lpk 66,

tag like street art on a garage door in an alley  ynn doh

Along Dundas St. West between Islington and Kipling there are a series of more than twenty murals that depict scenes from the history of the area. 

In 1793, Simcoe’s Queen’s Rangers cut a route through the forest for Dundas Street.  It was meant to serve both as a military route in case of war with the U.S. and as a route to increase settlement in the area.   Settlement of what became the village of Islington began a few years later with the arrival of the Johnston family in 1808.

The first mural was a picture of the Methodist church painted on plywood.  It no longer exists.

mural 2 – The Way We Were, part 1 by John Kuna, 2005.
Looking east along Dundas St. towards Cordova Ave in 1912.  It includes Hopkins store and the Methodist church.

large mural on the side of a building that shows people in old fashioned clothes walking down a street.  A man in a horse drawn wagon is coming down the street.

part of a large mural on the side of a building that shows people in old fashioned clothes walking down a street.  A man in a horse drawn wagon is coming down the street.

mural 3 – They Way We Were part 2, 1912, by John Kuna, 2006.
Because of the car that was parked next to it, I don’t have a good photo of the whole mural.

a mural showing a group of men in clothing from the 1930s shoveling in the dirt.

part of a mural, a man leading a horse out of the stables, the Islington Hotel behind.  Two ladies are standing on the balcony of the second floor of the hotel.  A man is reclining on a chair on the front porch of the hotel.

mural 4 – Timeline: Islington Then and Now, by John Kuna, 2006.
Showing Dunn’s store (NE corner of Dundas & Burnhamthorpe Cres) as well as the flowering catalpa trees that used to line the street (on the right in the picture)

part of a mural depicting the main street of town as it was in the 40s and as it was in 2006.  cars, street, people shopping,

blog_islington_here_right

mural 5 — Honouring Islington’s Volunteer Fire Brigade, by John Kuna, 2007. 
Islington had its first motorized fire truck in 1931.  In the 1940s and 1950s the volunteer firefighters would use water from the Mimico creek to flood part of Central Park, on the west side of the creek, to create a skating rink.

looking across the street at a mural on the side of white brick building, a winter scene, some people are skating, lots of bright red jackets, there is also an old fashioned fire engine with firefighters sitting in it.  At the right edge of the picture is a small wood hut with a sign that says Refreshments on it.

close up of a mural showing people skating on a frozen pond in the winter.  In the foreground is a traffic sign that says no trucks, also blue street signs for Cabot St. and Dundas Street West

mural 6 – Riding the Radials, by John Kuna, 2007.
From 1917 to 1931 the old Guelph Radial Line (or Toronto Suburban Railway) ran close by this site.  It was an electric rail line between Toronto and Guelph.

A mural showing the front of an old electric train car with the conductor sitting in front.  Two boys are hanging out the doors, one on each side of the train car.

mural 7 – Briarly, Gone but not Forgotten, by John Kune, 2007.
Briarly, also known as Gunn House was built in 1840s. From 1870 to 1985 it was owned by the Montgomery family and their descendents.

mural 7 - Briarly, Gone but not Forgotten, by John Kune, 2007.  Briarly, also known as Gunn House was built in 1840s.  From 1870 to 1985 it was owned by the Montgomery family and their descendents.

A woman and a girl in long light blue dresses are walking in front of a house.  The woman is carrying a blue parasol.  There is a white picket fence and flowering shrubs in the foreground of the picture.

mural 9 – Harold G. Shipp’s Firt High Flier, by John Kuna, 2008.
The story behind this mural: “In 1944 Harold Shipp convinced a Lancaster bomber pilot who ferried supplies from Toronto to England during the war, to fly over the school’s football field and drop hundreds of leaflets, a few of which could be traded for tickets to the school dance. Unfortunately, a rogue wind scattered the leaflets across the Chinese market gardens near Montgomery’s Inn. In the ensuing mayhem, excited football fans frantic to secure a winning ticket, stormed the field and trampled the carefully tended cabbages”

mural showing men playing football in the 1920s, with a low flying airplane overhead.

mural showing men playing football in the 1920s, with a low flying airplane overhead, as seen from an angle - form this perspective you can see that the mural is actually two pictures.

mural 10 – Portraits from our Past by Sarah Collard, 2008.
Inspired by pictures taken in the early 1900’s. “These include: Apple Packers at Bigham family orchards, Rathburn and Martingrove ~1917; Sunday Afternoon, a scene showing the family of famous Islington photographer Walter Moorhouse on their veranda at 34 MacPherson Ave. (now Aberfoyle); Islington’s First Car, a 1917 Chevrolet owned by the Appleby family; and the Village Shoemaker, Mr. Nelson in the 20th century.”

mural in 4 parts, 1 on the left, 1 on the right and 2 in the center.  The left depicts a man selling apples, the right depicts a cobbler fixing shoes.  In the center: bottom, a family in old fashioned car.  Center top - a family sitting in a livingroom including a man in a rocking chair

mural 11 – Mimico Creek in Fall, ca 1920, by John Kuna, 2008.
Looking north towards the Dundas Street bridge.

A large mural of a creek.  On the left back are two painters with their easels set up beside the river.  On the right bank are two boys and a man

Gordon’s Dairy, by John Kuna, 2008.

A mural on the front of the Islington Senior's Centre showing dairy carts.

mural 13 – The Old Swimming Hole by June Kuna, 2009.
Swimmers at the mill pond.

large mural of people swimming in a creek in bathing costumes from the 1920s

closer view of part of the mural of people swimming in a creek.  In this part of the picture, kids are climbing on a water wheel.  The mural is reflected in the window of the store next to it.

mural 14 – The Pub with no Beer, by June Kuna, 2009. 
A scene from the Prohibition Era in the late 1920’s.   Men collecting empty pop bottles from outside the Islington Hotel.

mural showing men loading an old flat bed truck with crates of empty pop bottles, 1920s

Fox and Fiddle bar, a two storey brick building,

mural 15, Faith of Our Fathers, part 2, by John Kuna

mural showing the building of a chirch

mural 16 – The Manse Committee by John Kuna 2010

mural on the side of a two storey white brick building.  The picture looks like the outer wall has been removed to reveal a family house from the early 1900s.  A cook is working in the kitchen,

blog_islington_16kitchen

The Prodigy, by John Kuna, 2011
A satellite branch of the Royal Conservatory of Music was located in this building from the 1950s through the 1980s.

mural depicting a boy playing a piano in front of an audience.  A man is helping to turn the pages of the music.

mural 19 –  Aftermath by John Kuna, 2011.
After Hurricane Hazel on 15 Oct 1854, most of Islington Golf Course and the low lying areas around Mimico Creek were flooded.

large painting of men in boats, helicopter overhead

mural 20 – Ontario Gothic, by John Kuna, 2011

A mural of a man and a woman standing outside a two stroey farm house.  A white car is parked in front of the mural and it blocks the bottom right of the picture.

mural 21 – Toboggan Hill, by John Kuna, 2011

large vertical mural depicting a hill in winter.   Bare trees, kids on tobaggons.

Close up of the bottom part of a mural whowing kids on old fashioned wooden sleds, or toboggans.

Fishing in Mimico Creek, by John Kuna, 2012,
with Riding the Radials seen in the background.

 includes largemouth bass, rainbow trout, pumpkinseed sunfish

The Faces of Islington, by John Kuna, 2013

The Faces of Islington, by John Kuna, 2013

blog_islington_21part

the mural with no sign

mural of a group golfing in clothes typical of the 1940s

 more information – village of Islington murals website