in never never land

Posted: September 1, 2016 in public art
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Hiding in a park, dappled by the sunlight filtering through large leafy trees, stands Peter Pan.  At least the sign says that he’s Peter Pan; he looks like a boy with a flute standing on a lumpy pedestal.   He’s a replica of one that resides in London’s Kensington Gardens that was sculpted by Sir George Frampton in 1912.   He’s been standing near the NW corner of Avenue Road and St. Clair  since 1929 when the city acquired this piece of land.   At that time the College Heights Association raised the money to purchase the statue for this “children’s garden”, a statue dedicated “to the spirit of children at play”.

a statue of a boy on top of a large pile that is composed of fairies and forest animals such as squirrels, mice and rabbits, under the shade of a large tree, in a park, playground behind

There are no pirates or lost boys here though, just fairies and woodland animals – rabbits, mice and squirrels.  There’s even a tiny snail if you look closely enough.  What looks like a nondescript lump from a distance turns out to be an interesting game of find the creatures.

part of a sculpture, a squirrel is sitting on its back legs, looking at two fairies (women with large wings) who are looking back at the squirrel

sculpture, close up of the faces of two women, two hands, bronze, weathered

part of a sculpture, some rabbits, a fairy poking her head up

Once upon a time this was Peter Pan park but now it is Glenn Gould park (he once lived nearby).

 

 

 

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